American Wooden Movement Tall Clocks: 1712-1835

The full story of the early American wooden clockmaking industry is presented for the first time with the publication of: American… read more

Willard's Patent Time Pieces: A History of the Weight-Driven Banjo Clock, 1800 - 1900

Roxbury Village Publishing is proud to announce the publication of an exciting new book: Willard’s Patent Time Pieces: A History of… read more

Samuel Abbott of Dover, New Hampshire, Boston, Massachusetts and Montpelier, Vermont.

Samuel Abbott was born in Dover, New Hampshire in 1791. He was the son of Stephen Abbott and Mary Gile. On August 10, 1813 Samuel married Jane Day of Concord, New Hampshire in the small village of Boscowen. Soon after, the newlyweds move to Dover and Samuel opened a jewelry shop. It is in this small New Hampshire town that Samuel began his career as a clockmaker, watchmaker, silversmith, and jeweler. Samuel and Mary had two sons. Their son John Sullivan Abbot worked in Montpelier, Vermont in similar trades. In 1827, Samuel moved from Dover to Boston, Massachusetts. He is listed in the Boston Directories as a clockmaker in 1827 through 1831. After leaving Boston, Samuel moved North to Montpelier, Vermont. He first advertises himself as clock and watchmaker in January 1830. In 1831-32 he formed a partnership with a Mr. Freeman as Abbott & Freeman. Abbott was again listed as watchmaker and jeweler at Montpelier in 1849 and in 1860 in the New England Business Directories. He lived there until his death on May 4, 1861 at the age 70. Examples of tall clocks, shelf clocks, New Hampshire mirror clocks, lyre wall clocks, and patent timepieces have been found. He is noted for his distinctive three-pillar, “grand piano” shaped timepiece movements. Many of these clocks are found with a teardrop shaped pendulum keystone.

Nathan Adams

Nathan Adams was born in Newbury, Massachusetts in 1755. He is listed as a “joiner” in Danvers, Massachusetts in 1783 and in Andover, Massachusetts in 1784. By 1786 Adams returned to Danvers as an apprentice to clockmaker Ezra Batchelder. In 1792 Nathan Adams moved to Wiscasset, Maine and then to Boston in 1796, where he remained until 1825.

John C. Almy and William A. Wall Almy & Wall of New Bedford, Massachusetts.

Almy & Wall of New Bedford, Massachusetts. They are listed in Paul Foley’s book, “Willard’s Patent Timepieces” as working in New Bedford for the period of October 21, 1821 through August of 1823. In partnership, they made tall clocks and wall timepieces.

John C. Almy is listed as a Clockmaker and a Watchmaker working in 1820 -1872. He was born in Newport, Rhode Island on June 19,1802 and died in South Dartmouth, MA on February 2nd, 1872. In 1821, after the divorce of the partnership with Wall, Almy moves to Exeter, NH by 1824 to continue in clock related businesses.

William A. Wall is listed as a Clockmaker, Watchmaker and Artist. He was born in New Bedford on May 19, 1801 and died there on September 6, 1885. It is reported that he was an apprentice to Hanover, Massachusetts Clockmaker John Bailey Jr. Shortly after the breakup of the partnership with Almy, Wall takes an interests in painting and signs on as a student of John Scully. By 1826 he advertises his talents as a portrait painter. Later he travels aboard to study his new trade.

Ansonia Clock Company

"Bagdad" Ansonia Clock Company of Ansonia, Connecticut. Wall clock.

This example, called the “Bagdad,” is in a wonderful original condition. The case wood is black walnut and retains an older… read more

Ansonia Clock Company, New York. La Cruz. Royal Bonn.

This porcelain case clock was made by the Ansonia Clock Company of Ansonia, Connecticut. This clock is in very good original… read more

Ansonia Huntress Ball Swing, Diana

This is a fine example of an American Swing clock made by the Ansonia Clock Company. This form, the swing clock,… read more

Samuel Aspinwall of Pittston, Maine.

Samuel Aspinwall of Pittston, Maine. He was born in Canton, Massachusetts and died in Berlin, Maine. Aspinwall worked in Cambridge, MA during the period from 1803-1813. In an 1803 lawsuit, Aspinwall describes himself as a Cambridge, Clockmaker. It appears he also worked in Salem, MA before moving to North to the town of Pittston. It is documented that Aspinwall had business dealings with the Boston Clockmakers Daniel Munroe and John MacFarlane. He is described as a Pittston clockmaker in two separate civil lawsuits filed in 1810 and 1811 by Monroe and Macfarlane to recover unpaid promissory notes. Very few signed clocks have been found to date.

Charles Babbitt of Taunton, Massachusetts.

Charles Babbitt was born in Taunton on December 3rd 1786 and died there on August 13 1854. He is listed as a clockmaker, watchmaker, silversmith, jeweler, merchant and inventor one time or another during the period 1807- 1850. His shop was located on Main Street and was in direct competition with Abner Pitts of the same town. We have owned and sold several tall clocks signed by this Maker.

Calvin Bailey of Hanover, Massachusetts and Bath, Maine.

BAILEY, CALVIN – Hanover, MA Bath, ME – Clock maker. 1782-1835. Born in
Hanover on Jan. 21, 1761, died in Bath, ME in 1835. Son of John Bailey Sr. Calvin worked in Hanover until 1828 when he moved to Bath, ME. Calvin was most likely trained by his father. His brother John Jr. was also a clock maker who made many tall case clocks. Calvin’s account book exists and mentions other Clockmakers including David Studley who worked 1806-09 as a journeyman and cabinetmaker.

John Bailey II of Hanover, MAssachusetts

John Bailey II was born the son of John and Ruth Randall Bailey on May 6th, 1751. He learned clockmaking at a very young age is is responsible for training numerous apprentices such as his younger brothers Calvin and Lebbeus as well as Joshua Wilder, his son John III, Joseph Gooding, Ezra Kelley and Hingham’s Joshua Wilder. He was the most prolific of the six Baileys that were involved in the clock business. John was a Quaker. Over the years, we have owned a fair number of clocks made by him. Some of which included tall case clocks, dwarf clocks and the Massachusetts shelf clock form.

John Bailey II of Hanover, Massachusetts. Tall case clock.

This country maple case tall clock was made by John Bailey II of Hanover of Massachusetts. John Bailey II was born… read more

John Bailey Jr., of Hanover, Massachusetts.

John Bailey Jr. a Quaker, was born in 1787. He was born into an active clockmaking family that had be working at manufacturing clock since the mid 1780’s. It is believed that was trained by his father, John II. In 1809, when he finished his apprenticeship, he moved to Portland,Maine and met and married Anna Taber the daughter of a prominent Quaker merchant in Portland. By 1811, they returned to Hanover. It is interesting to note that he had a fair amount a business in the South. in the winter he would travel to places like North Carolina and repair clocks. He also contracted to manufacture clocks for a number of Southern residents. In 1823, his father died and John Jr. moved to New Bedford. In 1848, he moves to Lynn, Massachusetts where he died in 1883. John was active in the antislavery movement for many years. His activism cost him substantial business losses over time. Over the years, we have owned a fair number of clocks made by him. Some of which included tall case clocks, dwarf clocks and the Massachusetts shelf clock form.

Edward Pyson Baird

Edward Payson Baird was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on January 26, 1860 and died in October 23, 1929 at the age of 69. In 1879 he went to work for the Seth Thomas Clock Company until 1887 when he moved to Montreal, Canada. Here he formed the Baird Mfg. Co., which was located at 112 Queen Street. He also opened a sales office at 13 Park Row in New York City. In Montreal, Baird manufactured wooden cases that housed Seth Thomas made movements. The front of the cases were fitted with very recognizable doors that prominently displayed the advertising for various products which his client’s companies sold. Many of these doors were made from paper mache. His business model of selling clocks to companies so that they could advertise their wares was successful and the business grew. In July of 1890, he moved the company to Plattsburgh, New York and set up shop at 18 Bridge Street along the Saranac River. Baird had numerous clients in the States as well as in Great Britain as is evident by the surviving examples. He had a good run until 1896 when a local sheriff took possession of the company’s assets which were soon sold at public auction. By 1897, Baird established himself in Chicago. Here he began to focus on the telephone industry applying for as many as twelve patents and then later eleven additional patents for locks and keys.

For a more in-depth history, please read Baird Advertising Clocks written by Jerry Maltz in 1998.

The Baird Clock Company of Plattsburg, New York

This Baird Advertising Clock was made in Plattsburg, New York. The fine example advertises “Baltimore Clothiers” of “Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.” The term… read more

Jedidiah Baldwin of Northampton, Massachusetts, Hanover, New Hampshire and New York State.

Jedidiah Baldwin was born in Norwich Connecticut on March 29, 1768. He was the oldest son of Jabez and Lydia (Barker) Baldwin of that seaport town. Jedidiah was to apprenticed to Thomas Harland who was also working in Norwich. Harland was a very accomplished clockmaker watchmaker, silversmith jeweler, instrument maker and engraver. Baldwin is thought to have finished his apprenticeship with Harland in 1791. On April 10th, of that year, Baldwin married Abigail Jones of Norwich (born 26 June 1772) and soon moved north to Northhampton, Massachusetts. He set up a shop and advertised “Clock & Watch Making & Repairing. Together with Jewelry in its various branches.” Samuel Stiles and Nathan Storrs were also listed as being in business at this time. On July 20, 1791, the partnership between S. Stiles and J. Baldwin was advertised in the New Hampshire Gazette. Their shop was to be located in Stiles current place of business nearly opposite the Meeting house. This partnership lasted nearly a year before Stiles left Northampton and moved first to Windsor Connecticut and then to Chester, Massachusetts where he is thought to have died in 1826. On the 4th of July, 1792, Baldwin & Nathan Storrs ran an advertisement in the New Hampshire Gazette. It announce their partnership. Storrs had been working as a clockmaker, watchmaker, gold and silver smith in town for at least a year. Their shop was “the Shop lately occupied by STILES & BALDWIN.” (A cherry case tall clock is known signed by this firm. It is interesting to note that the engraved silvered brass dial is signed Baldwin & Storrs / Northampton and is dated 1793.)

Nathan Storrs was born in Mansfield, Connecticut on August 7th, 1768 the son of Amariah and Mary Gilbert Storrs. It is currently thought that he was trained as a clockmaker by Jacob Sargeant. Nathan first advertises in Northampton, Massachusetts in 1791 and that he is open for business and is lately from New York. In 1792, he forms a partnership with Samuel Stiles as Stiles & Storrs. This partnership quickly dissolves and in 1792 and Nathan takes on Jedidiah Baldwin as Baldwin & Storrs until 1793 when Baldwin moves to Hanover, NH. In 1827, Storrs & Cook (Benjamin F. Cook) form a partnership that lasts until 1833. In 1829, they open an additional outlet in Amherst, Massachusetts. Nathan retires in 1833 due to poor health and dies in 1839.

In January of 1794, Baldwin & Storrs advertised that the partnership had dissolved. Jedidiah left Northampton and moved North to Hanover, New Hampshire sometime in that latter part of 1793. In the village of Hanover, as well as being a clockmaker, Baldwin served as the postmaster in of town from 1797-1811. He is also recorded to have trained his younger brother Jabez while working here. Jedidiah left Hanover in 1811 and moved to New York State where he moved several times. His first stop was in Fairfield, New York and is listed there as a silversmith until 1818. From 1818 to 1820 he is listed as working as a watchmaker and silversmith in Morrisville, New York. In 1834 he is listed as working in Rochester and in 1838 he is lasted as having a shop on Washington Street. Baldwin died on March 29, 1849 in Rochester. He is buried in the Mount Hope Cemetery.

Baldwin & Storrs of Northampton, Massachusetts.

The partnership Baldwin & Storrs advertised on July 4, 1792 in the New Hampshire Gazette that they were now in business together in “the Shop latelt occupied by STILES& BALDWIN.” This shop was located in nearly opposite the Meeting house in Northampton. This partnership lasted until January of 1794 when Storrs advertised that it had dissolved and that he was to carry on the trade.

Please see their individual listings in the Libary of Clockmakers.

Samuel Keer Barker of Framlingham, UK.

Samuel Keer Barker is listed in Brain Loomes new book, “Watchmakers & Clockmakers of the World.” Loomes lists Barker as working in the Market Hill section of Framlingham. This small village is located approximately 13 miles north east of Ipswich in Suffolk County. Samuel was born in 1801 the son of Thomas Barker who was also a Clockmaker. Samuel succeeded Thomas in clockmaking in 1823 and was in business until 1864. He is believed to have died before 1874. Loomes reports that his wife carried on his business until 1874 and trading as a Jeweler, silversmith and ironmonger until 1889.

Barker & Taylor of Worcester, Massachusetts.

Jonathan Barker and Samuel Taylor formed a partnership as Barker & Taylor sometime before 1807. Little is currently known of these two individuals and their clocks are considered rare. In fact, this is one of the two tall case examples currently known to us signed in this manner. A third example is signed ‘J. Barker, Ashby.’ Based on the number of clock that are known to have survived, we can assume that they were not prolific clockmakers. All three feature wooden geared movements that share the same construction characteristics and format of the Ashby Clockmaking school. In addition, the painted dials are from there as well. As a result, it is logical to assume that Barker received his training there and later moved to Worcester and joined Taylor in the Barker & Taylor venture. It is recorded that Barker died in 1807. Samuel Taylor was born in 1780 and died in 1864. He is listed as a clockmaker in 1807 through 1856. So it is reasonable to assume that he carried on the business after Barker died.

Barker & Taylor of Worcester, Massachusetts

This fine example features a case that is constructed in pine and retains it's original painted surface. The pine was wash… read more

Ezra Batchelder of Danvers, Massachusetts.

Ezra Batchelder was born in Andover, Massachusetts on November 13th, 1769. He had a brother, Andrew born 1772, who is also listed as a Clockmaker and blacksmith. In fact, they are listed as working together in Danvers in sometime after 1801. It is thought that they were trained by their brother-in-law Nathan Adams. Ezra dies in in Danvers on October 10th, 1858. Ezra was also a farmer and is reported to be the first expressman in Danvers, carrying merchandise from and to Boston.

Paul Foley in his book, Willard’s Patent Time Pieces lists that Ezra’s account book is known. This book records 36 clocks being sold between 1803 and 1830. The prices for these clocks range from $35 to $65. It also suggests that being fine cabinetmakers. they made their own cases.

Over the last forty plus years of being in the business of selling clocks, We have seen at least 12 tall clocks signed by this Maker.

Ezra Batchelder of Danvers, Massachusetts. Tall case clock.

This is a fine butternut case tall clock with painted dial signed " Ezra Batchelder Danvers." The case proportions are very… read more

Louis Bernhard of Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania.

Louis Bernhard is listed in several references as a watchmaker and jeweler working most of his life in Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania.

Louis Bernhard was born in Bavaria, Germany, in 1839. His family immigrated to America when he was a year old settling in New York City. With in a few years, they moved West to Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. Here he spent his childhood and was educated in the local town’s school system. At he age of seventeen, Louis began an apprenticeship in the watch making trade with John F. JORDAN of that place. In 1858, Louis relocated in the village of Bloomsburg where he established the watchmaker’s and jewelers’ business of his own. In 1859, he exhibited a chronometer watch at the Columbia County county fair. He claimed to have manufactuered all of it’s parts. This is thought to have been the first watch ever made in the county. It is reported that during his residence in Bloomsburg, he trained eleven apprentices in the watch trade. He is also said to have served the community as an architect and provided the plans for the Lowenberg & Cadman block, the Episcopal parsonage and his residence on Fifth Street. Even the iron fence surrounding his well kept and ornamental grounds was cast from designs drawn and furnished by him. He also enjoyed oil painting and was a carver in marble and wood. A few examples of his work survive. Examples include an elaborately finished case of black walnut housing an astronomical clock of most intricate and perfect workmanship, an elegant inlaid box for his drawing instruments, a large elaborately carved black walnut looking-glass frame, several oil paintings that included landscapes representing some of the choicest scenery in the vicinity of Bloomsburg, several copies of famous paintings, among them “Shakespeare and his Friends.” All of these paintings are well executed and denote a high order of artistic skill. He has also executed oil portraits of himself and his wife and other members of his family. Mr. BERNHARD was a resident of Bloomsburg for nearly thirty years. He is thought to have been progressive and public-spirited, and has served this vicinity as a member of the council. He married Anna J. TOWNSEND in April, 1862. They had six children. Mr. and Mrs. Bernhard were members of the Episcopal Church. He made a study of civil engineering at Wilkes-Barre Academy, and completed his studies in New York City. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Bloomsburg, pg. 323)

Other known articles include his wheel cutting engine which is in the William Penn Memorial Museum in Harrisburg. A floor standing regulator made by him is in the NAWCC collection in Columbia, PA. This clock is described as a Regulator, having an eight-day time only brass movement. It utilizes the escapement invented by Thomas Reid of Edinburgh, Scotland in early 1800s. The heavy brass plates are skeletonized and attached to a wooden seatboard. The movement is engraved, “Louis Bernhard / Bloomsburg PA.” The pendulum is a Harrison gridiron design. The bob is also engraved with “Louis Bernhard, Maker.” The painted glass dial allows view of movement. It includes a subsidiary seconds dial. The walnut case is fitted with six glass panes. The interior is painted black with his portrait on behind the pendulum.

Louis Bernhard of Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania. Floor standing regulator.

This very impressive floor standing regulator that was made in 1875 by Louis Bernhard of Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania. The design of which… read more

Belding Bingham of Nashua, New Hampshire.

Bingham was born in Shoreham, Vermont on July 5th, 1812. He worked primarily as a Watchmaker in Nashua, New Hampshire for most of his life although he is malso reported to have worked briefly in Lowell, Waltham and in Roxbury, Massachusetts. It appears he had a working association with Leonard Noise, and for a short time with Fisher Thayer and J.S. Warner. Bingham died in Nashua on October 3rd, 1878.

Birge & Fuller Bristol, Conn.

John Birge (1785 -1862) and Thomas Franklin Fuller (1798 – 1848) shared a successful partnership in Bristol Connecticut from 1844 through 1848. They made many steeple clocks with a large variation of movements. This firm is probably best known for making steeple on steeple clocks powered by wagon spring movements.

Wagon Spring Steeple on Steeple Shelf Clock.

27116 Birge & Fuller Wagon Spring powered Steeple on Steeple Clock. This is a very good example of a steeple on… read more

Birge, Peck & Co. of Bristol, Connecticut

The Birge, Peck & Co. of Bristol, Connecticut was a firm comprised of John Birge, Ambrose Peck, Samuel Taylor and William R. Richards. This venture started in 1849 and lasted until 1859. John Birge retired in 1855.

Chauncey Boardman

Chauncey Boardman was born in 1789. He worked in Bristol in 1810 through 1850. He began making wood tall clock movements with Butler Dunbar until 1812 when he bought him out. Boardman made movements for other companies including Chauncey Jerome. In 1832 he formed a partnership with Joseph Wells. They operated four separate factories that produced wood movements in great quantity until 1837 when rolled brass was then introduced. In 1844 the firm split and each continued under their own name. Chauncey Boardman died in 1857.

Chauncey Boardman, Fusee powered Beehive

This is a mahogany veneered case beehive clock was made by Chauncey Boardman of Bristol Conn., USA. This is a pretty… read more

Boardman & Wells

Chauncey Boardman was born in 1789. He is listed as working in Bristol in 1810 through 1850. He began making wood tall clock movements with Butler Dunbar until 1812 when he bought him out. He then made movements for other companies including Chauncey Jerome. In 1832 he formed a partnership with Joseph Wells. They operated four separate factories and produced in great quantity wood movements until 1837 and the introduction of rolled brass. In 1844 the firm split and each continued under their own name. Chauncey Boardman died in 1857.

Boston Clock Company of Boston, Massachusetts.

The Boston Clock Company was organized by Joseph H. Eastman & James Gerry on May 29,1884. The facory was actually located across the harbor in Chelsea. This Company was formed as the successor to the Harvard Clock Company. Joseph H. Eastman became the manager of the this new firm. In January of 1894 the Boston Clock Company was sold to the Ansonia Clock Company of Brooklyn, New York. All tools machinery and patents were included in the sale. In March of the same year, Joseph Eastman and others tried to revive it as the Eastman Clock Company. This new firm lasted only one year. The Boston Clock Company manufactured clocks predominately in the style of the crystal regulator, carriage clocks and other mantel clocks in marble case. A few wall clock were produced.

Boston Clock Co., Boston, Massachusetts. No. 4.

The Boston Clock Company was organized by Joseph H. Eastman & James Gerry on May 29,1884. It was actually located in… read more

Boston Clock Company,  "DELPHUS."

The "Delphus" is arguably their prettiest model. It measures approximately 10.5 inches tall, 7.5 inches wide across the base and 5.75… read more

John Boyd of Sadsburyville, Chester County, Pennsylvania.

John Boyd was born in 1805. It appears he inherited the duties of running the family farm and Tavern in 1827 when his father, Machael Wallace Boyd, died on November 8th. There he established his clockshop. In 1857 he married Sarah Armstrong from the village of Compass which was located nearby. A large land owner, the 1830 tax records record that he own 90 acres at that time. He died on April 26, 1867. He left his property to his wife and children.

John Boyd of Black Horse Farm in Sadsburyville, Chester County, Pennsylvania

This clock was made by John Boyd clockmaker and watchmaker of Black Horse Farm in Sadsburyville, Chester County, Pennsylvania circa 1830.… read more

Gawen Brown of Boston, Massachusetts.

Gawen Brown was born in England in 1719 and died in Boston at the age of 82 in 1801. It is recorded that he came to this country sometime before 1749. It is in that year, on February 6th, that he advertised in The Boston Evening Post that he was a “…Clock and Watchmaker lately from London, Keeps his shop at Me. Johnson’s Japanner, in Brattle Street, Boston, near Mr. Copper’s Meeting House, where he makes and sells all sorts of plain, repeating and Astronomical Clocks, with cases plain, black walnut, mahogany or Japann’d or with out.” During his lifetime, much was written about his making and installing a tower clock at the Old South Church in Boston. The Old South Church was erected in 1730 without a clock. Brown installed his clock sometime between 1768 and 1770. Between the period of 1752 and 1760, Brown moved his shop and home several times. He married three times and had a total of twelve children. On April 5, 1750, Brown married Mary Flagg. Together they had six children before she died in 1760. She was only 31 years old. His second wife, Elizabeth Byles, was the daughter of Mather Byles. Mather was a famous clergyman who presided over the Hollis Street Church. Elizabeth lived only three more years and had no children. She died in 1763. In 1764, Brown married Elizabeth Hill Adams. Elizabeth was the widow of Dr. Joseph Adams who was the brother of Samuel Adams. Elizabeth bore him six more children. Based on a number of newspaper advertisements, Brown imported a number of English clocks and watches from England. During the period of 1789 through 1796, Brown is listed in the business directories as a watchmaker.

Gawen Brown has been often referred to as “The Tory Clockmaker.” This title implies that he was loyal to the King of England. In fact, an article written in magazine Antiques in January of 1929 suggests that Brown left the Colonies and returned to England during the Revolution. This simple cannot be true due to the fact that he had an extensive military career. Brown first enlisted in the Independent Company of Cadets on December 7, 1776. The Cadets were an independent organization and accordingly, it was possible for one to hold an official rank with them as well as with another military company at the same time. He served as a Corporal in the Rhode Island Expedition from April 15, 1777 to May 5, 1777. In April of this same year, he was appointed the rank of Captain in a Continental Regiment lead by Colonel Henry Jackson. He resigned form this on October 23, 1778. In 1779 he was made Brigade Major of the Penobscot Expedition. This tenure lasted from July 2, 1779 to October 8, 1779. Brown left military service in 1781. At that time, he held the rank of Lieutenant Colonel.

Very few Clockmakers live and worked in the states during this early time period. Pre-Revolutionary clocks made in this country are quite rare and very few exist. The majority of clocks that would have been available would have been from English sources.

A portrait of him is reportable owned by The A. W. Mellon Educational Charitable Trust. Reproductions of which proudly hang in the Old South Church and in the Cadet Armory.

Gawen Brown of Boston, Massachusetts

This is a very rare and important mahogany case tall clock made by Gawen Brown of Boston, Massachusetts. This movement is… read more

Gawen Brown of Boston, Massachusetts. Tall case clock.

This is a very rare mahogany case tall clock made by Gawen Brown of Boston, Massachusetts. This case sits flat to… read more

Jonathan Clark Brown of Forestville, Connecticut

Jonathan Clark Brown was born in Coventry, Connecticut on October 8, 1807 the son of Jonathan Clark and Sophia (Bingham) Brown. He came to Bristol in 1832. He was a case maker or joiner and over his life time was involved in many firms including The Forestville Manufacturing Co. and the Bristol Clock Co. He was an instrumental and very influential figure and developing the Connecticut clock industry. An innovator, he was responsible for the case design of the very collectible “Acorn” clock as well the octagon case with rounded corners and other interesting case designs. As a clockmaker, he experienced many financial setbacks in Bristol. He left Bristol broke in 1858 and moved to Nyack, New York. He died there in 1872.

For a more in depth over view of his life, please read Kenneth D. Roberts and Snowden Taylor’s book, Jonathan Clark Brown and the Forestville Manufacturing Company.

Daniel Burnap of East Windsor, Connecticut.

Daniel Burnap was the son of Captain Abraham and Susan (Wright) Burnap. He was born in Coventry, Connecticut on November 1, 1759. It is In 1774, he is listed as an apprentice of Thomas Harland. Harland was a very talented English born clockmaker who settled in Norwich in 1773. It is thought that here, he learned not only the skill of clockmaking but also engraving, silversmithing, watch repairing and other related skills. As a journeyman, Burnap settled in East Windsor sometime before 1779 and in 1805 he built the homestead which he continued to occupy during the remainder of his life. It is in this town that he was most active making clocks and training apprentices of his own. This includes one of ConnecticutÕs most famous clockmakers, Eli Terry. Other apprentices that are thought to have trained under Burnap include Daniel Kellogg, Harvey Sadd, Abel Bliss Lewis Curtis, Nathaniel Olmsted, levi Pitkin, Flavel Bingham, Ela Burnap and Thomas Lyman. Daniel was an active and respected citizen. He was for many years a Justice of the Peace and held court in a spacious room on the first floor of this house. In his latter years, probably before 1815, he gave up his shop, and fitted up a room in the attic of the house where he could keep busy at the less arduous kinds of work such as engraving and repairing watches. He died in 1838 at the age of seventy-eight, a prosperous and respected citizen.

Daniel Burnap of East Windsor, Connecticut. Tall case clock.

This important cherry case tall clock was made by Daniel Burnap of East Windsor, Connecticut. This fine cherry case retains an… read more

Enoch Burnham

It is not known where Enoch Burnham was born. It appears he was born in the Paris area sometime around 1770.  Paris is a town that is located approximately 50 miles northwest of Portland in Oxford County.  It is the county seat. It is a charming village having wonderful views of Mt. Chocorua and Mt. Washington in the White Mountains.  Excellent pastures and orchards have thrived in this region.  The Little Androscoggin River provided water power for this region.  Burnham was well established as a clockmaker in Paris prior to 1800.  Jonathan Bemis is listed as one of his apprentices you also worked there.  It is recorded that Burnham owned a considerable amount of land in this small farming community.  He is recorded as living in Westbrook in the 1820’s until his death sometime before 1850.  

Very few clocks by Burnham are known.  Examples of signed Burnham clocks are difficult to come by.  Most of the tall case clocks reported are signed on the dial.  The place location usually listed is Paris.  A Westbrook example is known.  For a more complete listing of these Makers, please review “Clockmakers & Clockmaking in Maine  1770 – 1900,” written by Joseph R. Katra Jr.

Abiel Chandler of Concord, New Hampshire.

Abiel Chandler was born in Concord, New Hampshire on April 2, 1807. He was one of twelve children born to Major Timothy Chandler and his wife Sarah Abbot. Abiel was the youngest son. Seven of Abiel’s brothers an sisters died at a young age and three became insane. It is thought that Abiel and his brother Timothy, were both trained by their father to be clockmakers and are listed as working with him in the 1820’s. In 1829, Abiel enters a partnership with his Father as “A. Chandler & Co.” It is also reported that in this year, he traveled to Boston to learn how to make Willard’s Patent Timepieces. Abiel died in Concord on April 22, 1881. He is listed in the records as a clockmaker, silversmith and a mathematical instrument maker. Several signed surveying instruments are have been recorded. Over the years, have owned and sold several shelf clocks, New Hampshire mirror wall clocks, lyre and patent timepieces signed by this Maker.

Timothy Chandler of Concord, New Hampshire.

Major Timothy Chandler was born on April 25, 1762 and died on August 9, 1848. He was apprenticed to a local maker on hand cards for carding wool. He moved for a short time to Connecticut and moved back to Concord in 1785. It is not known who he learned clockmaking from. A possibility would include Peregrine White of Woodstock, Connecticut or Jonathan Hale of Pomfret, Connecticut. In Concord, he became a prolific clockmaker until his retirement in 1829. In 1797 he enlisted with the minute Men and received the commission of Major in 1799. Chandler had many interests, some of which included card making, goldsmith, silversmith, fireward and many other civic positions.

We have owned numerous tall case clocks, wall timepieces and New Hampshire mirror clocks by this important New Hampshire clockmaker.

Timothy Chandler signed No. 1. and dated 1785.

This is a historically significant maple and tiger maple case tall clock made by Timothy Chandler of Concord, New Hampshire. The… read more

Asahel Cheney

Asahel Cheney was born in 1759 in Hartford, Connecticut. He was the oldest son of the Hartford clockmaker Benjamin Cheney and Deborah Olcott. Many examples of Benjamin’s work have been recorded. A large number of which have movement constructed of heavy wooden gearing. Asahel and his two brothers Martin and Russell were most likely trained by their father. By 1790, Asahel had moved to Northfield, Massachusetts and was a property owner. He lived in what is now known as the Joseph Byrt house. Here he continued to manufacture mostly tall case clocks. We have owned several examples of his work over the years. Some of which are constructed with brass movements. Another Example of his work can be found in the Mabel Brady Garvin Collection at Yale University.

By the mid 1790’s, Asahel moved to Windham County Vermont to the town of Putney. A shelf clock which is now in the collection of the Henry Ford Museum is signed on the kidney shaped engraved brass dial, “Asahel Cheney / Putney” It is form this clock that we speculate that Asahel trained his brother Martin in the clockmaking trade. On the seat board of this clock it is inscribed, “This clock was made by Martin Cheney.”

Soon after 1800 the brothers parted company. Asahel moves North and by 1809 his name is listed in a land transaction in the town of Royalton.

Cheney

This is a signed Putney, Vermont Example. This fine cherry case tall clock is well proportioned. It stands on nicely formed… read more

Martin Cheney

In 1778, Martin Cheney was born into a well known and established clockmaking family. He was one of four clockmakers born to Benjamin Cheney 1725-1815 and Elizabeth Long Cheney in East Hartford, Connecticut. Benjamin most likely trained all four of his boys in the art of clockmaking. Asahel was the oldest and was born in 1759. He moves on into Vermont. Elisha was born in 1770 and died in 1847. He settled in Berlin, Connecticut. Russell was younger. It appears he moved North to Putney, Vermont. Martin also had an uncle Timothy 1731-1795. He becomes a well known clockmaker in East Hartford and works closely with Benjamin. By 1803, Martin moved up the Connecticut river to Windsor, Vermont. In 1804 he advertises that he has for sale fine English Watches, watch keys, chains and seals. He moves to Montreal in 1809. Here he remained for some twenty years. In 1827, Martin places an advertisement in Burlington, Vermont newspaper for a journeyman clockmaker to work with him in Montreal. In 1817 he forms a partnership with J. A. Dwight and advertised this business as Cheney & Dwight. Several clocks have been recorded by this Maker. Pictured in “The Best the Country Affords: Vermont Furniture 1765 – 1850” is a signed brass dial tall clock by Asahel Cheney. On the seat boat of the clock it is written, “This clock made by Martin Cheney.” This implies that the two work with it other on occasion. There is also a Massachusetts Shelf clock form with an engraved kidney style brass dial in the Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield Village. This clock is signed by “Martin Cheney Windsor.” This clock has a strong Boston influence.

Martin Cheney Windsor, Vermont. Number 18. Clockmaker & Silversmith.

This is a wonderful inlaid mahogany case. The painted dial is signed by the "Windsor, Vermont" clockmaker "Martin Cheney." This example… read more

William Claggett of Newport, Rhode Island.

William Claggett is included in Patrick T. Conley’s Rhode Island’s Founders from Settlement to Statehood. Conley’s book, written in 2010, lists 57 names of the most historically important members of the State of Rhode Island. He is the only clockmaker to be included.

William Claggett was a clockmaker, watchmaker, compass maker, organ builder engraver, printer, lecturer, author and scientist.

William Claggett is considered one of America’s earliest clockmakers. He is thought to have been born in Wales in 1696. He came to the Colonies, first to Boston sometime before 1714. Here he married by Cotton Mather to Mary Armstrong on Oct. 21, 1714. She was the daughter of Mathew and Margaret Armstrong. Their marriage record exists. In 1715, he placed his first advertisement which he identified himself as a “Clock-Maker near the Town-House.” By 1716, he had moved to, and settled in Newport, Rhode Island until his death in 1749. Here he was admitted as a Freeman. His original house still stands and is located at 16 Bridge Street. This is not true of his shop which was located to the west of the Brick Market. This building was demolished after his death in order to make access to Long Wharf. His neighbors included the brothers Job I and Christopher Townsend both of whom were cabinetmakers. It appears Mary died some time around 1727. William then married his second wife Rebecca and she was named in his will. It should also be mentioned that William had at least five children. His son Thomas, born in 1730 and died in 1767, was also a clockmaker. William’s daughter Mary married James Wady of Newport. James Wady was also a clockmaker. Two other daughters, Hannah Threadkill and Elizabeth Claggett and a son Caleb are mentioned in his will.

William was civic minded and was a member of the 7th Day Baptist Congregation as well as a founding member of Newport’s local fire company. He kept close ties to Boston and we also know that he had other interests. He was a talented engraver. So much so that he printed paper money for the state of Rhode Island in 1738. He was a merchant, as well as an author. He manufactured musical instruments, and was a dabbler in science and electricity. In 1746, he put on a public demonstration of electricity that was generated by a machine he made. He performed a similar demonstration in Boston the following year. Interestingly, the monies generated from these exhibitions were given to charity. It is also thought he introduced Benjamin Franklin to this science. Certainly, he had a first rate mind.

Examples of his work demonstrate his ability to make high quality clocks. Today, very few examples are known. It is well documented that he built the original tower clock for the Trinity Church. The Redwood Library & Athenaeum in Newport is the oldest lending library in America. It has an example of a tall clock that was donated to them in 1948 by Bishop Samuel Babcock who was a descendant of the original owner, the Staton family. This clock was thought to have been made in 1723. A second clock, a wall clock made circa 1732, is at the 7th Day Baptist Meeting House. This clock is thought to have been the earliest wall clock made in America.

Newport, Rhode Island's most famous Clockmaker William Claggett.

A most rare Queen Anne Block and Shell tall case clock made by William Claggett of Newport, Rhode Island. This handsome… read more

James Cole of Rochester, New Hampshire.

James Charles Cole was born in Boston in 1791 and died in Rochester, NH in 1867. At an early age, James traveled from Boston to Rochester to learn the trade of clockmaking with Edward S. Moulton. Moulton is listed as moving from Rochester to Saco, Maine in 1813. In Rochester, James married Betsey Nutter, daughter of John D. Nutter and Hannah Dennett. Betsey Nutter was born on 27 Mar 1802 in Barnstead, NH. Her younger brother John learned clockmaking in Rochester as well. James father two sons and three daughters and became a prominent citizen. As well as manufacturing many clocks, James was an active silversmith and repaired watches and jewelry. He was very active in town affairs serving on a committee to build a new church, he was a trustee of a local savings bank, he served a ten year term as the secretary to the Masonic lodge, he served 13 years as town clerk and two years in the State legislature. We have owned numerous examples of tall case clocks, banjo clocks and New Hampshire mirror clocks with his signature on the dial. Based on the large numbers we have seen and owned, James Cole must have been a successful clockmaker.

Mr. & Mrs. James C. Cole

These photographs were found secured to the backboard a tall case clock made by James C. Cole. read more

James Collins of Goffstown, New Hampshire.

James Collins is known to be buried in Wolcottville, Indiana. His gravestone is still located there and gives his birth date of August 8th, 1801 and lists his death on December 8th, 1882. James Collins was born in Goffstown, New Hampshire the son of Stephen Collins, James married Lucy Knight of Hancock, New Hampshire. Lucy was a daughter of the Clockmaker Elijah Knight. It is thought that James received some clock training from him. It is also reported that Collins traveled to Ashby, Massachusetts and to Providence, Rhode Island from time to time. One could speculate that he traveled to these towns on clock related business. The town of Ashby was very small and did not have much to offer as a destination other than an interest in the Edward’s and Willard brother’s school of wooden works clock production of tall clocks. In Goffstown, Collins is listed as a “Husbandman, Yeoman, Silversmith, Jeweler, Watchmaker and Clock and Watchmaker in various towns deeds over the years. It appears that Collins left Goffstown in the mid 1840’s after Lucy’s death in 1844. From here he moved to Illinois, possibly Michigan and then to Fort Wayne, Indiana. Very few clocks have been found. We have owned at least three different forms. They include this tall clock, a New Hampshire Mirror clock and recently a full striking banjo clock. The New Hampshire Historical Society has an example of his work in their collection. Charles Parsons, the author of “New Hampshire Clocks & Clockmakers” actually live in Collins house for a number years.

James Collins of Goffstown, New Hampshire.

This is a rare New Hampshire striking banjo clock made by James Collins of Goffstown, New Hampshire. Full striking banjo clocks… read more

William Crawford of Oakham, Massachusetts.

William Crawford was born in Rutland, Massachusetts on October 23, 1745. It is reported that he moved to Oakham in 1750 at the age of five. His father Alexander, was one of the founders of this town.  William Crawford was a soldier of the Revolution at the rank of Captain.  He married Mary Henderson in 1773 and fathered 11 children.  He lived the rest of his life in Oakham and died on June 30, 1833. He was 87 years old. His house is still standing today. Reportedly, with the “Clock room” still intact.

Oakham is still a very small town located in central Massachusetts. It is just North of the town of Spencer and to the West of the town of Rutland. Oakham was Incorporated in 1762. Originally it was called “Rutland West Wing.” Some of it’s first settlers are reported as coming from Oakham, England and hence took the name. Very little information is listed regarding this Maker. Several other tall clocks have been found. We have owned at least two other examples and have seen two examples sold at public auction. In addition, their are at least two on public display. One is in the collection at Old Sturbridge Village in Sturbridge, Massachusetts. Another example can be found in the Massachusetts Room at the Daughters of the American Revolution Museum located in our Nations Capital, Washington, DC.  It seems that many of Crawford existing clocks are design in a diminutive scale.

Thomas Crow of Wilmington, Delaware.

Thomas Crow was the son of George Crow who was also a Wilmington, Delaware clockmaker. Thomas appears to have been involved in clockmaking as early as 1770. He becomes one of Delaware’s most prolific and best known clockmakers. He is recorded to have served the public in several local government positions. In 1805, he moves through Philadelphia and later to West Chester, Pennsylvania during the period 1808 to 1810. One can find examples of his work in the collections of Winterthur Museum and the Briggs Museum of Art.

Thomas Crow of Wilmington, Delaware.

This handsome walnut case tall clock was made by Thomas Crow of Wilmington, Delaware. This clock was made circa 1790 and… read more

William Cummens of Roxbury, Massachusetts.

William Cummens was born 1768 and died on April 20, 1834 at the age of 66. He worked in Roxbury as a clockmaker as early as 1789 through 1834. He was trained by Simon Willard and along with Elnathan Taber, Cummens stayed in Roxbury and made many clocks for his own clients while maintaining a close working relationship with the Willard family. In this Roxbury location, Cummens had direct access to the same suppliers, such case makers and dial painters that the Willards used. As a result, his clocks are very similar in form. He was one of the first persons authorized by Simon Willard to manufacture the new patent timepiece. Over the past 45 plus years in business, we have owned and sold many tall case clocks, Massachusetts shelf clocks and wall timepieces signed by this important clockmaker. Very few tall case examples are found with his original set up label.

William Cummens Label

This is a photograph of a William Cummens set up label. Traditionally, these are pasted to the back of the waist… read more

William Cummens of Roxbury, Massachusetts.

This outstanding example is in wonderful original condition. The case is constructed in mahogany and appears to retain it's original finish.… read more

Edmund Currier of Hopkinton, New Hampshire.

Edmund Currier was born the son of a Doctor on May 4, 1793 in Hopkinton, New Hampshire. He lived until the age of 60 years young and died in Salem, Massachusetts on May 17, 1853. His first shop was located in Hopkinton. This shop was previously owned by Philip Brown who was also a clockmaker. As a result, it is thought that Brown may have trained Edmund in the clockmaking trade. There is also some evidence that suggests that he worked for a short period of time with either the Hutchins brothers or Timothy Chandler in Concord. Interestingly, Edmund’s account books for the period which he worked in Hopkinton have survived. Today, this book is located in the New Hampshire Philomatic and Antiquarian Society of Hopkinton. This account book provides us with a synopsis of the businesses he conducted there. He lists manufacturing and repairing items such as spectacles, cutlery, tablewares and jewelry. He did locksmith work, gunsmith repairs and manufactured instruments for doctors. He dealt in musical instruments. His brother Ebenezer was a piano maker. Edmund manufactured and repaired tools, wagons, sleighs and harness. He was also a fine clockmaker and repaired some watches. A small number of clocks are listed as being made in this New Hampshire location. Edmund moved from Hopkinton in 1825 to the corner of Essex and Central Streets in Salem, Massachusetts. In 1828, he moved his business to 7 Derby Square. This was centrally located “In the market.” In 1831, Currier formed a partnership with George B. Foster. Currier trained Foster. This partnership was located at 11 Derby Square. The firm of Currier & Foster lasted until 1835. The clocks made during this period are usually signed “Currier & Foster.” This firm advertised as having for sale watches, clocks and timepieces of their own manufacture. They are also listed as jewelers. After 1835, Currier continues to advertise on his own. His business is now located on Essex Street and that he was still in the business of making and selling “Timepieces, Gallery-Clocks, Regulators…” While in the town of Salem, Currier was deeply involved with the Salem Charitable Mechanic Association. It was recorded by his associates that he was “accustomed to working sixteen hours out of twenty-four.” He was admired for his talents.

Very few clocks by Currier and Currier & Foster are known. Examples are difficult to come by. Several other timepieces as well as a lyre form, a dwarf form and less than a hand full of tall clocks are reported. There is a tall case clock in the museum collection at the Essex Institute and we currently own what may be the only Hopkinton signed example. For a more complete listing of these Makers, please review “Willard’s Patent Timepieces” written by Paul Foley.

Currier lists in his account books that he purchased tall clock cases from David Young and David Young Jr. It appears that he purchased 10 cases from David Young and one from David Young Jr. They are listed as follows:

Clock cases purchased from David Young,

1.) July 11, 1816 clock case $35.00.
2.) Jan. 1st, 1817 cherry case $16.00
3.) May 27th, 1817 clock case $20.00
4.) July 11, 1818 case in cherry for $16.00.
5.) June 1, 1817 in cherry for $16.00.
6.) July 11, 1818 in cherry for $16.00.
7.) Nov. 6th, 1818 a mahogany case for $25.00.
8.) November 12, 1818 he purchased a mahogany case for $25.00
9.) November 12, 1818 he purchased a birch case for $14.00
10.) May 24th, 1820 a cherry case $14.00.
Clock case purchased from David Young Jr.,
1.) June 28th, 1816 he purchased one cherry case for $16.00.
From the same account books, it is recorded that he sold eight case clocks. Prices range from $35.00 to $65.00.

Edmund Currier of Hopkinton, New Hampshire. Tall case clock.

This fine cherry example stands on a cut out bracket base. The feet are nicely formed and have very good height.… read more

Lemuel Curtis of Concord, Massachusetts

Lemuel Curtis was born in Roxbury, MA in 1790. He died in New York on June 17, 1857. Lemuel had two brothers who were also involved with clockmaking. He was the nephew of Aaron Willard and probably trained with Simon Willard in Roxbury. He was a terrific clockmaker and the inventor of the Girandole. For and in depth description of his clockmaking activity, please read Paul Foley’s book, “Willard’s Patent Time Pieces.”

Lemuel Curtis of Concord, MA. "Warranted By L. Curtis"

A Lemuel Curtis Timepiece from Concord, Massachusetts. This is a fine Federal Massachusetts timepiece or “Banjo clock” made in Concord, Massachusetts… read more

Lemuel Curtis Timepiece Concord, Massachusetts

This is a fine Federal Massachusetts timepiece or “Banjo clock” made in Concord, Massachusetts circa 1820 by Lemuel Curtis. This is… read more

Daniel Pratt & Sons

Daniel Pratt & Sons of Reading and Boston, Massachusetts

This is an oversized octagon top cottage clock. The standard size measures 9 inches tall. This example is just better than… read more

Daniel Pratt & Sons Reading, Mass

This very colorful clock was retailed by Daniel Pratt & Sons of Reading, Massachusetts. The case is made from papier-mache. Papier-mache… read more

Nathaniel Dominy of East Hampton, New York.

Nathaniel Dominy (4th) was born in 1737 and died in 1812. He is listed as living in Sag Harbor and then East Hampton, New York. For a more complete story regarding this family, please read Charles Hummel’s “With Hammer in Hand, published for The Henry Francis du Pont Winterthur Museum by the University Press of Virginia Charlottesville.” This work was first published in 1968.

The Dominy family presided over a remarkable domain from their little shops on North Main Street in East Hampton. They were located there as early as 1760 through 1840 spanning three generations.

Nathaniel Dominy of East Hampton, New York. Dated 1789.

This Long Island treasure was originally sold to Captain David Fithian (1728-1803). A very simple form, it is constructed in gum… read more

James Doull of Charlestown, Massachusetts.

James Doull was born in Scotland in 1785 and immigrated to the United States in 1806 at the age of 29. In 1807, he is listed in the Boston tax records as working with Clockmaker Aaron Willard as a journeyman. This suggests that he came to this country highly skilled and must have been trained overseas. Because he is listed for only one year in Boston, it is assumed he moved to Charlestown shortly after this date. In 1823 he moves to Pennsylvania and he took up residence in Philadelphia. In 1823 he is listed at 112 High. in 1825 at 3 Castle. 1828 – 1833 on hte south east corner of South and Spruce. 1835 through 1849 south east corner of 4th and Spruce. in 1856 on South 4th. He is listed there until 1856. Over the years we have owned several tall case clocks, shelf clocks and a timepiece made by this fine Maker.

James Doull of Charlestown, Massachusetts. Cabinetmakers John & Thomas Seymour of Boston, Massachusetts.

An important Hepplewhite tall case clock with an automated rocking ship painted dial signed by James Doull of Charlestown, Massachusetts. The… read more

Ephraim Downs in Wilbraham, Massachusetts.

Ephraim Downs was born in Wilbraham, Massachusetts Dec. 20, 1787. He was the son of David and Mary Chatterton Downs. He married Chloe Painter in 1822 and became the brother in law of Silas Hoadley and Butler Dunbar. Both of whom where in the clock business. Ephraim spent the period of 1825 through 1845 in Bristol with George Mitchell. Here they made tall clock movements, Pillar & Scroll cases and many wood movement shelf clocks. In 1842 he retired due to poor health and died in 1860. Throughout his Clockmaker career, Ephriam worked with or for a number of other Connecticut Clockmakers such as Eli Terry, Luman Watson, Seth Thomas, George Mitchell, Elisa Ingraham and George Atkins.

Joseph N. Dunning of Concord, Massachusetts and Burlington, Vermont.

Joseph N. Dunning was born in Brunswick, Maine on January 2nd, 1795 and died in Burlington, Vermont on December 14th, 1841. He was first a journeyman working for Lemuel Curtis in Concord before their partnership in 1820. In 1821, both men moved to Burlington, Vermont which was experiencing an economic boom at the time. There, they became two of Vermont most prolific manufactures of wall timepieces. In 1832, the partnership dissolved and Dunning continued to work on his own. He died bankrupt at the age of 46. For a further discussion on Vermont made time pieces and the clockmaker Joseph Dunning, please read Paul Foley’s book, “Willard’s Patent Timepieces.”

John N. Dunning of Burlington, Vermont. Wall Timepiece.

This is a very interesting wall timepiece. It was made by Joseph N. Dunning of Burlington, Vermont. This example is signed… read more

John Edwards of Ashby, Massachusetts.

John B. Edwards was the son of Ashby clockmaker Abraham Edwards. John was born in Ashby, Massachusetts on October 20, 1787. Abraham and first wife, Rebecca, had four children before Rebecca died in 1813.   The four children are recorded in Ashby:  Rebecca b. April 1, 1785, John b. Oct. 20, 1787, Sally b. Sept. 28, 1794, and Abraham A. b. June 17, 1796.  On June 13, 1811 John married Libby Waters in Ashby.  John live a total of 38 years and died Oct. 1, 1825 in Ashby. John was a clockmaker. We have owned and seen several examples of his work. The movements have been very similar to the thirty-hour wooden geared clocks made by his Father and the other Ashby clockmakers.

Samuel Edwards of Ashby, Massachusetts.

Samuel Edwards “Jr.,” was born on August 18, 1787. He was the first of six children born to Calvin Edwards and Mary (Houghton) Edwards of Ashby, Massachusetts. Samuel’s father and uncle Abraham were productive clockmakers. In partnership, they signed their tall clock dials “A & C Edwards.” They began making wooden geared tall case clocks in 1792. It is estimated that they made approximately 600 clocks before Calvin died on March 16, 1796. Calvin died as a result of blood poisoning. This was caused by a wound he received on his leg below the knee from falling from a tree. Samuel would have been just 9 years old. After Calvin’s death, his uncle continued to manufacturer clocks under his own name. It is assumed that Samuel learned clockmaking from his uncle. We have owned numerous clocks that were signed by both the partnership and by Samuel Edwards solely.

In 1808, it is recorded that Samuel moved to Gorham, Maine. Three years later, on November 5, 1811, Samuel marries Nancy Burr of Ashby. They had seven children. Here in Gorham, Samuel continues to make wooden geared clocks. Many of which feature an unusual dial arrangement. The size of the wooden dial blank stays at the traditional measurement of 12 inches across. The hour and minute time rings are scaled down to 7.5 inches in diameter. These time rings are then repositioned from the center to below the center of the dial. Above this is an overlapping time ring, again 7 inches in diameter, that displays only the seconds. A large second hand, measuring almost 6 inches in many cases, sweeps around this and is visually impressive. We have seen this format on clocks made in Ashby as well. In fact we have owned clocks made by Alex Tarbell Willard ( At work in Ashby 1800 – 1830) and John Edwards (At work 1809 – 1812) that share this dial arrangement. It in interesting to note that a large percentage of Samuel’s clock are formatted this way. It appears to be a later feature in this wooden geared production run. Sometime in 1823-24, Samuel moves from Gorham to Portland. There he become a Brass founder and is not reported to have made clocks. Samuel dies in Maine on February 13, 1853. He was 65 years old.

Samuel Edwards of Gorham, Maine.

This is an example in very good condition. It is quite typical of the standard form that one would expect from… read more

Abraham & Calvin Edwards of Ashby, Massachusetts.

Abraham Edwards is believed to have been born in Concord, Massachusetts in 1761. His younger brother Calvin was born two years later in 1763. Both were the sons of Samuel Edwards and Huldah Easterbrook of Concord. The family moved from Concord to Ashby, Massachusetts sometime in 1777. Ashby was then and still is today a small village located in Massachusetts on the New Hampshire boarder due North of Worcester. Both Abraham and Calvin were hard workers and owned everything in common including several pieces of land in the town of Ashby. They entered a partnership in 1792 and made wooden gear clocks. These clocks are signed on their dials A & C Edwards. This partnership lasts approximately four short years before Calvin’s death at the age of 33. While alive, the partnership appears to have produced in excess of 530 plus clocks. Often times the production number is listed at greater than 600, but the highest number that I have personally seen recorded is in the upper 530’s. It is assumed that all the clocks made after the partnership ended are signed by Abraham only. Of which, many such examples have been found. Early examples of the A&C partnership features composite metal dials. The later examples, sometime after the number 211, feature the use of a painted wooden dial. Abraham and Calvin were responsible for training other clockmakers. Some of which include Abraham’s son John, Calvin’s sons Calvin Jr. and Samuel, Alexander, Jacob and Philander Jacob Willard of Ashburnham, Wendell and his brother Whittear Perkins and possibly John Barker of Worcester. This list of names is still growing.

A & C Edwards No. 170. Painted case tall clock.

read more

A & C Edwards of Ashby, Massachusetts. No. 211. Tall clock.

This country case is constructed in New England white pine and retains an old scrubbed surface. This surface is consistent throughout… read more

Nathaniel Edwards Jr., of Acton, Massachusetts.

He was born in Acton on September 19th,1770. His working dates are listed from 1791-1800. Nathaniel worked in his fatherÕs house which still stands today. It is located at 328 Pope Road which is near the Concord line. Very few clocks made by this Maker have been found. All of those have been of the tall case variety. They have been found in cherry and mahogany cases.

In 1993, the Concord Antiquarian Museum received a tall clock made by this Maker as a gift. That clock is reported to have been originally purchased by Nathan Brooks (1785-1863). He was a lawyer, legislator and a philanthropist. He was also a Whig and his wife was an abolitionist. He lived where the present library sits. This is on the corner of Main Street and Sudbury Road. This clock was purchased from the Brooks estate in 1881 for $75. It was purchased by the Richardson family. It is a descendant of this family that donated the clock.

Epes Ellery of Boston, Massachusetts.

Epes Ellery was born in Gloucester, Massachusetts in 1780. The Ellery family was well connected in this coastal town. His Father was a merchant and his uncle, Epes Sargent, owned a significant part of the town property. Sargent’s portrait was painted by John Singleton Copley and is on display in the National Gallery in Washington, DC. It is considered one of Copley’s finest work. Epes also had a cousin William Ellery, that signed the Declaration of Independence.

Epes must have moved to Boston in his early twenties. He is listed in the Boston Directories as a goldsmith, a lapidary and a jeweler in 1803, 1806 and again in 1809. In 1810, he married Ann Bullard of Watertown and soon moved to Baltimore, Maryland. Here they raised five children working as a goldsmith and served in the army during the War of 1812.

At least six other clocks are known to us. Three are owned privately and were sold by our firm. One was sold in the 1980’s. The other had a rocking ship automated dial and was sold more recently. Another clock is on display in the Montclair Historical Society’s 1796 Crane House which is located in Montclair, New Jersey. This clock is reported to have a label applied to the case. A fourth clock is now in the possession of Historic New England and has a history of being owned by the Tufts family of Massachusetts. This is the fifth now documented example and is currently owned by us and offered for sale here. It is a formal inlaid mahogany example and features a lunar calendar in the arch of the dial.

Epes Ellery of Boston, Massachusetts.

Epes Ellery was born in Gloucester, Massachusetts in 1780. The Ellery family was well connected in this coastal town. His Father was a merchant and his uncle, Epes Sargent, owned a significant part of the town property. Sargent’s portrait was painted by John Singleton Copley and is on display in the National Gallery in Washington, DC. It is considered one of Copley’s finest work. Epes also had a cousin William Ellery, that signed the Declaration of Independence.

Epes must have moved to Boston in his early twenties. He is listed in the Boston Directories as a goldsmith, a lapidary and a jeweler in 1803, 1806 and again in 1809. In 1810, he married Ann Bullard of Watertown and soon moved to Baltimore, Maryland. Here they raised five children working as a goldsmith and served in the army during the War of 1812.

At least five tall clocks are known. Two are owned privately and were sold by our firm. One was sold in the 1980’s. The other had a rocking ship automated dial and was sold more recently. A third clock is on display in the Montclair Historical Society’s 1796 Crane House which is located in Montclair, New Jersey. This clock is reported to have a label applied to the case. A fourth clock is now in the possession of Historic New England and has a history of being owned by the Tufts family of Massachusetts. This is the fifth now documented example and is currently owned by us and offered for sale here. It is a formal inlaid mahogany example and features a lunar calendar in the arch of the dial.

Reuben Elsnorth of Windsor, Connecticut.

Reuben was born in 1736 and died in 1785. He was the son Giles Ellsworth and Hanna Stoughton. Reuben married Elizabeth Moore. Ms. Moore was born in 1743 and died in 1798. Reuben had an older Uncle David who was also a clockmaker. David was born in 1709 and lived until 1782. It is logical to assume that David trained his nephew. This clock is currently the only known signed example made by Reuben.

Jesse Emory of Weare, New Hampshire.

Jesse Emory was born on July 17, 1759 in Weare, New Hampshire. He was the son of Caleb Emory of Amesbury and Susannah (Worthley). Jesse is reported to be the first male born in that town and one of the first New Hampshire born Clockmakers. At the age of twenty, Jesse enlisted in Captain Lovejoy’s company for the defense of Portsmouth. Jesse married twice. His first marriage was to Hannah Corliss in November of 1783. She bore him one daughter, Ruth. His second marriage was to Betsy Wyman of Hillsborough, New Hampshire in February of 1786. Jesse purchased 27 acres of land from Jeremiah Corliss, his first father-in-law. This land and building was located on Mt. Dearborn Road in Weare near the Henniker town line. He operated a business here until 1806 when he moved to Deering. He sold his land to his daughter. The Town Histories of Henniker and weare and the deeds recorded for the land transactions made list him as a mechanic, farmer and a yeoman. He is reported to have made spinning and flax wheels, measures, harnesses and clocks. He was a skilled cabinet and clockmaker making the entire clockworks and cases out of wood. The vast majority of clock found are fitted with thirty-hour pull-up movements. (One eight-day key wind example has been identified.) The movements are constructed entirely of maple with a five posted frame. He used heavy plates and heavily constructed wheels. He also incorporated four gravity clicks on each of the winding arbors rather than the typical spring, click and ratchet mechanism. His movements attach to the seatboard with a wooden screw which threads into the middle pillar post of the movement. The dials are skillfully painted on maple and are signed “Jesse Emory / WEARE” or “Jesse Emory / of / WEARE” are known. The decoration and details have been incised to prevent paint bleeding. Emory also constructed his own cases, which were typically made of birch or maple woods. A fair number of these have been found that have been grain painted. A number of his cases incorporate a unique door latch. Very few clocks have been found by this ingenious Maker. Approximately 12 clocks are recorded. Jesse died on July 10th, 1838. He was 79 years old.

Jesse Emory of Weare, New Hampshire. Wooden geared tall case clock.

This is a wonderful example. The case is well proportioned and retains it’s original grain painted surface. The case appears to… read more

Jesse Emory of Weare, New Hampshire.

This is an excellent example having a case constructed in maple and in a form most commonly found in Concord, NH. read more

Jesse Emory of Weare, New Hampshire.

Jesse Emory was born on July 17, 1759 in Weare, New Hampshire. He was the son of Caleb Emory of Amesbury and Susannah (Worthley). Jesse is reported to be the first male born in that town and one of the first New Hampshire born Clockmakers. At the age of twenty, Jesse enlisted in Captain Lovejoy’s company for the defense of Portsmouth. Jesse married twice. His first marriage was to Hannah Corliss in November of 1783. She bore him one daughter, Ruth. His second marriage was to Betsy Wyman of Hillsborough, New Hampshire in February of 1786. Jesse purchased 27 acres of land from Jeremiah Corliss, his first father-in-law. This land and building was located on Mt. Dearborn Road in Weare near the Henniker town line. He operated a business here until 1806 when he moved to Deering. He sold his land to his daughter. The Town Histories of Henniker and weare and the deeds recorded for the land transactions made list him as a mechanic, farmer and a yeoman. He is reported to have made spinning and flax wheels, measures, harnesses and clocks. He was a skilled cabinet and clockmaker making the entire clockworks and cases out of wood. The vast majority of clock found are fitted with thirty-hour pull-up movements. (One eight-day key wind example has been identified.) The movements are constructed entirely of maple with a five posted frame. He used heavy plates and heavily constructed wheels. He also incorporated four gravity clicks on each of the winding arbors rather than the typical spring, click and ratchet mechanism. His movements attach to the seatboard with a wooden screw which threads into the middle pillar post of the movement. The dials are skillfully painted on maple and are signed “Jesse Emory / WEARE” or “Jesse Emory / of / WEARE” are known. The decoration and details have been incised to prevent paint bleeding. Emory also constructed his own cases, which were typically made of birch or maple woods. A fair number of these have been found that have been grain painted. A number of his cases incorporate a unique door latch. Very few clocks have been found by this ingenious Maker. Approximately 12 clocks are recorded. Jesse died on July 10th, 1838. He was 79 years old.

R. B. Field & Co. of Brockville, Canada.

The firm of R. B. Field & Co. Brockville, Canada is listed in, “Early Canadian Timekeepers” written by Jane Varkaris and James e. Connell. Rodney Burt Field was born in February 25, 1809 and died March 18, 1884. According to the authors, this firm did not sell a large number of clocks which is based on the number of which survive today. The authors speculate that Field was in the retail business of selling clocks in Canada on two separate occasions. Otherwise he worked for various enterprises in the United States.

R. B. Field & Co. Brockville, Canada. Og clock

This is a very clean example of a mahogany case og clock having the pasted label of "R. B. Field &… read more

Nichols Goddard of Shrewsbury, MA and Rutland, Vermont.

Nichols Goddard was born the son of Nathan and Martha (Nichols) Goddard in Shrewsbury, Massachusetts on October 4, 1773. It is thought that he learned clockmaking from his second cousin Luther Goddard who was also in Shrewsbury. Luther was trained by his cousin, our country’s most famous clockmaker, Simon Willard of Grafton in 1778. Luther is often credited with making the first watch in America. Nichols is listed as working in Northampton, Massachusetts in 1794 through 1797. A diary entry from 1795 states that as a journeyman, Nichols made movements for his father Luther Goddard, Gardner Parker of Westborough, Isaac Gere of Northampton, MA and for a man identified as “Ingalls” who is also in Northhampton. In June of 1797, Goddard moves north to Rutland, Vermont. At this time, the period of 1770 through about 1825, the state of Vermont enjoyed unprecedented population growth. It is in Rutland that Goddard formed a partnership with a silversmith who was originally from Norwich, Connecticut and more recently Pittsfield, Massachusetts. His name was Benjamin Lord. In September of 1798, Nichols returned to Northampton to marry Charity White. She was the daughter of Job White and Charity Chapin. They returned to Rutland and had seven children together. After their partnership ended, Nichols continued to make clocks under his own name until he died in 1823.

Nicholas involves himself in public affairs. In 1800 he is appointed Town Clerk of Rutland. He also serves as Town Treasurer from 1805 – 1807. He received the commission of Captain in the militia. He was also very active in the Masonic lodge. In 1802 he was elected Grand Junior Deacon of the Grand Masonic Lodge of Vermont and in 1804 through 1810 he served as Grand Senior Warden.

Nichols died in Rutland on September 23, 1823.

A dozen or so known clocks signed by Nicholas Goddard or signed Lord and Goddard are known. An example that is signed Lord & Goddard No. 124 is located in the Sheldon Museum . A musical example which is signed Nicholas Goddard is in the collection of The Bennington Museum. The Rutland Historical Society was given a Nichols Goddard Number 150 in 1996. They also own number 106 which has a repainted dial.

The tall case clocks that have been found signed by Lord & Goddard have the following numbers recorded…. 72, 75, 87, 95, 97, 98, 106, 111 and 113. Tall clocks signed by Nichols only include 124, 125, 144 and 150.

Nichols Goddard of Rutland, Vermont. No. 125

This case form is typical of what one would expect having a painted dial that is signed by "Nichols Goddard /… read more

Luther Goddard of Shrewsbury and Worcester, Massachusetts.

Luther Goddard Clockmaker, Watchmaker, Silversmith, Jeweler and Baptist Minister. Shrewsbury, Massachusetts.

Luther Goddard was born February 28, 1762 in Shrewsbury, Massachusetts. He was the cousin of Simon Willard and is thought to have trained or more appropriately apprenticed under him as early as 1778 at the age of 16. This indenture is thought to have lasted five years through 1783. He is then recorded as working in Shrewsbury in 1784 through 1817 as a clockmaker, watchmaker and as a silversmith. In 1784, Luther married Elizabeth Dakin on June 19. They had at least two children that worked in the clock, watch and silver trades. Parley Goddard, born in 1787, began training under his father in 1800. His brother Daniel, born in 1796, started training when he was 13. It is thought that Luther also trained his second cousin Nichols Goddard, born 1773 and died in 1823. Nicholas becomes one of Vermont’s most prolific clockmakers. He was located in the town of Rutland. In 1803, Luther formed what must have been a brief partnership with James Hamilton as Goddard & Hamilton. It is recorded that in 1807, Luther attended the estate sale of the Norwich, Connecticut clockmaker Thomas Harland. Here, he is said to have purchased a set of clockmakers tools. In 1809, he relocated his shop to Shrewsbury Hill. His shop here was one story and had a hip roof. It had a lean to on the back for the casting process. It is in this location that he began to manufacturer pocket watches and is credited as being the first American to make a significant attempt to do so. His silvered cased examples are thought to have originally sold for approximately $60. This would have been about the the same cost as a tall case clock. Today, his watches are prized by collectors. This first watch venture included his son Parley under the firm name of Luther Goddard & Son. Their timing was pretty good as imports were blocked by Jefferson and the “Jefferson Embargo” during the War of 1812. By 1815 the market was again flooded with imports and the watch business slowed. It is thought they produced approximately 600 or so watches by 1817. Some of the other firm names that were related to this venture are “Luther Goddard,” “L. Goddard & Son,” “L&P Goddard,” “L. Goddard & Co.,” “D&P Goddard & Co.,” etc… In 1817, Luther moves to Worcester, Massachusetts with his son Daniel and continues to repair watches and clocks, silversmithing as well as preaching as a Baptist minister. This shop was located on Main Street across from Daniel Waldo’s store. Luther dies in Worcester on May 24, 1842.

Luther Goddard of Shrewbury, Massachusetts.

This clock case is constructed in cherry and retains a wonderful mellow finish. The color is a deep brown that exhibits… read more

Alanson Gooding of New Bedford, Massachusetts.

Alanson Gooding was born in Dighton, Massachusetts on March 4th, 1789. He died in New Bedford, Massachusetts on November 18, 1877. Their were four brothers in the Gooding family that are listed as clockmakers. All were born to Joseph Gooding and Rebecca Macomber. The the four clockmaking brothers are Joseph born in 1773, Josiah born in 1777, John born in 1780 and Alanson. It is thought that Alanson trained under his older brother Joseph as a clockmaker. Joseph is reported to have trained with the Bailey’s of Hanover, MA. Alanson is listed as a clockmaker, watchmaker and merchant in New Bedford, for the period 1810-1840. Signed tall case clocks are also known.

For a more complete reference, please read Paul Foley’s outstanding book, “Willard’s Patent Time Pieces.”

Alanson Gooding of New Bedford, Massachusetts. Shelf clock.

This is a very nice example of a mahogany cased kidney dial shelf clock. The case sits up on applied French… read more

Joseph Gooding of Dighton and Fall River, Massachusetts.

The Clockmaker Joseph Gooding was born in Dighton, Massachusetts on March 6, 1773 and died in the same town on November 11, 1853. He worked both in Dighton and also Fall River, Massachusetts. Joseph was trained by John Bailey II in Hanover and started in business in 1793. He is thought to have trained his four brothers, Josiah, Alanson, Henry and John as clockmakers. Currently, we speculate that Joseph made some 40 plus tall case clocks. It appears that he numbered many of his tall case clocks on the dial. The highest number found to date is No. 38. This example is numbered. “9.” Interestingly, No. 8 is in the clock collection of Harvard University. This example, like those others documented, shares a case form and construction that reflects a strong Roxbury influence.

Joseph Gooding of Dighton, Massachusetts

This superb inlaid mahogany case retains a wonderful finish that is most likely original to the clock. It has taken a… read more

Henry Griffen of New York, New York.

Henry Griffen is listed as a clockmaker working in New York and in Brooklyn in 1791 through 1818. Very little is known of his output. This clock seems to indicate that he had some ties to Boston. I would speculate that he ordered this clock from there and then painted his name on the dial.

Henry Griffen of New York, New York. Case attributed to John And Thomas Seymour of Boston.

An important Hepplewhite tall case clock with dial signed by "Henry Griffen / New York." The inlaid mahogany case is attributed… read more

Ivory Hall of Concord, New Hampshire.

Ivory Hall worked in Concord, NH as a Clockmaker, watchmaker, silversmith, and jeweler between the dates 1816-1864. He was born in 1795, died in Concord on Nov. 15, 1880. In May 1819, he advertised “Opposite Gales Tavern, and one door south of the Phoenix Hotel, Concord, NH. That he has for sale, Patent timepieces, He manufactures, Willard’s Patent and Plain timepieces, and most kinds of Gold and Silver Ware.” In Feb. 1832, advertised his removal and “that he has purchased the stock in trade of Col. ROBERT DAVIS, and has taken the shop recently occupied by him”. In Oct. 1833, Hall sold his stock and relinquished his stand to Isaac A. Hall and recommend his former customers patronize his successor. However, by Feb. 1834 Hall was in business again and advertised at “J. WELLERS SHOP in the south wing of the Eagle Coffee-House, where he has for sale a good assortment of Silver Ware, Watches, Jewelry, Spectacles, &c”. Signed tall clocks, New Hampshire mirror clocks and patent timepieces are known. (Concord Courier, May 31, 1819 New Hampshire Patriot, Feb. 20, 1832, Oct. 14, 1833, Feb. 3, 1834)

Benjamin Hanks of Windham and Litchfield, Connecticut and Troy, New York.

Benjamin Hanks of Litchfield, Connecticut.

Benjamin Hanks was a skillful and energetic mechanic who made clocks and watches, carried on the repair business of each, was a goldsmith, a maker of stockings, looms, compasses, brass cannons and large church bells.

Benjamin Hanks was born in Mansfield, Connecticut on October 29, 1755 the son of Uriah and Irene (Case) Hanks. The Hanks family was an inventive group. At one time, they became the Nations largest producers of silk by importing the first mulberry trees from England and planting them in Connecticut and raising silk worms. Soon they invented and improved the apparatus for making silk into thread and constructed the first powered silk mill in the United States. The family built numerous forges and Benjamin is believed to be the first to cast large bells and bronze cannons in the country.

It is recorded that Benjamin learned the clockmaking trade from Thomas Harland, a noted Norwich clockmaker. Benjamin must have arrived at Harland’s doorstep with a solid mechanical background because his service with Harland had to be unusually short. Harland doesn’t arrive in Norwich until 1773 and Benjamin is said have been in the Boston area just before April of 1775. Why, well it is recorded that Benjamin served as a drummer during the Revolution and, in that role, took part in the march to Lexington in response to Paul Revere’s alarm. Shortly after, he enlisted or was assigned into General Israel Putnam’s Third Connecticut Regiment. Putnam was originally from Danvers, Massachusetts and move to Pomfret, CT in order to peruse inexpensive land. Putnam rushed north when he received news of the Battle at Lexington and Concord and joined the Patriot cause. He was a primary figure at the Battle of Bunker Hill. Perhaps Benjamin knew Putnam from his time in Connecticut? During this tumultuous time in our Country’s history, Hanks is said to have spent time working in a foundry owned by Paul Revere during and after the war. And yet, he still had time to married Alice Hovey about 1775 in Windham CT. (Alice Hovey was born on 15 Dec 1754 in Mansfield Center CT, christened on 19 Jan 1755 in Mansfield Center CT and died in Troy NY.

By 1777, at the age of twenty-two, Benjamin Hanks advertises form Windham, Connecticut as a Clock and Watchmaker and that he continued in the metal-smith’s trade making (according to an advertisement from the late 1770s) spurs, buckles, beads, hilts, clocks and watches, as well as general silver and gold work. In 1780, Benjamin moves to Litchfield, CT and builds a house and shop at 39 South Street to carry on his businesses. It is in the town of Litchfield that he performs the following accomplishments. Shortly after the move Benjamin is awarded the contract to make the clock for the Old Dutch Church at Nassau and Liberty Streets in New York City. In 1783, he petitioned the General Assembly for a patent for his invention of a clock wound automatically by air, and in 1785 advertised his clocks, Church clocks, pneumatic clocks, watches with center sweep seconds, surveyors’ compasses, etc. In 1786 he established a foundry and began casting large church bells. On the 6th of August 1787, Benjamin installs a bell in the Litchfield meeting house. The original one was broken. This bell was paid for by the society. In early 1790 he set up a “Brazier’s business.” In 1790, Benjamin moves to Mansfield where he continued to make clocks, bells and carried on the woolen business. In 1808 he and his son Truman form a partnership in the bell business and build a foundry in Troy, NY. The foundry made an assortment of items, including tower clocks, surveying tools, and church bells. One young man apprenticed at the Hanks’ West Troy foundry was Andrew Meneely who would later establish his own foundry in Troy and become one of America’s leading bell-makers.   Meneely is also buried in the Rural Cemetery in a family lot on the Middle Ridge. On the 4th of November, Benjamin was granted a patent for “Molding and Casting bells.”

Benjamin Hanks dies in Troy, New York in December of 1824 at the age of 70.

Benjamin Hanks

212103 Benjamin Hanks of Litchfield, Connecticut. This inlaid cherry case tall clock measures approximately 7 feet 9.5 inches or 93.5 inches… read more

Benjamin Hanks of Litchfield, Conneticut

212103 Benjamin Hanks of Litchfield, Connecticut. This inlaid cherry case tall clock measures approximately 7 feet 9.5 inches or 93.5 inches… read more

William Hanson of Windsor, England.

William Hanson is listed in Brain Loomes “Watchmakers & Clockmakers of the World.” He is listed as working in 1800.

Stephen Hasham of Charlestown, New Hampshire.

Stephen Hasham was born in October of 1764 in Boston, Massachusetts. His parents, Samuel (Jr.) and Hannah (Simpson) Hasham had nine children. Stephen was was the sixth. While growing up in Boston, Stephen and his father witnessed the battle of Breed’s Hill from the Coop’s Hill in Boston’s North End. They also watched the battle of Bunker Hill from the belfry of a meeting house at the North End of Boston. In 1775, his family moved west to the rural community of Grafton, Massachusetts. Two years later, Stephen and a brother moved ten miles away to the city of Worcester. It is now thought that Stephen was trained as a clockmaker by Abel Stowell. Stowell advertised frequently that he was looking to train young boys as apprentices in the skill of clockmaking. Town records support this in that Stowell was reimbursed for the care of Stephen and his brother Mayhew. Sometime by he mid 1780’s, Stephen and Mayhew move north to the small town of Charlestown, New Hampshire. This well positioned town had a population of approximately 900. On September 27, 1787, it is recorded that Stephen married Theodosia Hastings the only daughter of Deacon John and Susanna (Willard, Johnson) Hastings who were extensive property owners. Stephen and Theodosia had five children and it is here that Stephen establishes himself as a clockmaker.

We have owned and seen a number of tall clocks that were made by him. One fine example is a brass dial example that is in the collection of the New Hampshire Historical Society and is well documented. This clock is actually numbered “145” on it’s engraved brass dial. Currently we have for sale another brass dial example for sale. Hasham’s output was not limited to tall case clocks. It is reported that he also made clocks in the Massachusetts shelf clock. Several banjo style clocks are known. As many as ten tower clocks have been documented over the years. He also made several clocks that were designed to be mounted in the interior walls of a number of Charlestown homes. The walls acting as the case or protecting of the clock’s workings. A surveying instrument made by Hasham is in the collection of the Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan. In addition to clockmaking, Hasham was very active in trading real estate, he became a builder, an accomplished carver, and later a tavern keeper at his Eagle Hotel.

On March 6, 1841 his wife Theodosia died at the age of 72. They had been married 50 years. Interestingly, with in weeks, Stephen was courting a 23 year old school teacher by the name of Lucy Amy Miller. Stephen was now 76 years old. They were married in August 19th, 1841 and had five children together. The last child Emily, was born when Stephen was 86 years old. By 1851, financial difficulties begin to play a large role in Stephen’s life. In addition, his wife Lucy was deemed an insane person by the neighborhood and was committed in 1852. Financial hardships followed and he was soon ruined. The town of Charlestown was forced to watch over him until his death on February 3, 1861. He was 100 years young. Some of the stories regarding this man are priceless. Please read the December 1994 NAWCC Bulletin article, The Amazing Stephen Hasham written by Don Haven Lathrop and Frederick Shelley.

Stephen Hasham of Charlestown, Hew Hampshire. Tall case clock.

This is an important inlaid cherry case tall clock made by Stephen Hasham of Charlestown, Hew Hampshire. If you have any… read more

Nathaniel Hazeltine of Danville, Vermont.

Nathaniel Hazeltine is somewhat of an obscure Clockmaker. A brief reference can be found in Vermont Clock and Watchmakers Silversmiths and Jewelers 1778 – 1878 which was written by Lillian Baker Carlisle. The lists him as working 1856. A reference from Walton’s Register in 1856 and until 1858 list him as a “manufacturer of watches and jewelry.” We have done some additional research and have found an Enoch Hazeltine listed in Danville census in 1820 He is listed as the father of Nathaniel. Both father and son listed in the trades. In the same census, Nathaniel has a sister listed as ten years younger. A marriage record also exists for a Nathaniel Hazeltine of Danville marring Miss Meriam Hoyt on 12/10/1819. As luck would have it, a watch paper was recent discovered and sold by Eaton’s Auction Service in Vermont on 10/18/2008. The paper reads, “Nathl Hazeltine Clock, Watch, Maker. Danville, Vermont.” On the back it is dated “1816, May 31. M??? Waddock (sp?) 1817 February, 23.”

Nathaniel Hazeltine of Danville, Vermont. "No. 2."

This cherry case has excellent narrow proportions and decorative inlay work. The case stands on an applied bracket base. The four… read more

Silas Hoadley of Plymouth, Connecticut.

Silas Hoadley was born in 1786 and died in Plymouth, CT in 1870. He first apprenticed to his uncle Samuel and was making clocks in 1808. He became associated with Eli Terry and then Seth Thomas eventually purchasing their shares of the business. He became known for using movements of his own design like the “Upside down” style used in this clock. In 1849 he retired a wealthy man.

Silas Hoadley Miniature Time & Alarm Clock.

SS-166 This is a rare miniature time and alarm clock made by Silas Hoadley of Plymouth, Connecticut. This clock is in… read more

Philip Holway of Falmouth, Massachusetts

Philip Holway was born in Sandwich, Massachusetts on January 14, 1805 and died in Boston on November 28, 1864 at the age of 59. It appears he first worked in Falmouth as a clockmaker until he moved North to Lynn, Massachusetts in 1828. In Lynn, he advertised that he had taken a stand in Common Street opposite the Hotel. In 1833, an advertisement for him lists him as a watchmaker from Marblehead. In 1842 through 1863, he is then listed in the Boston directories as a watchmaker. He had a shop on Hanover Street. Over the years we have owned several tall case clocks, shelf clocks and a timepiece made by this Maker.

Jacob Hostetter of Hanover, Pennsylvania.

Jacob Hostetter is a listed Maker in the horological literature. Jacob was born on May 9th, 1754 near York, Pennsylvania. He died on June 29th, 1831 in New Lisbon, Columbiana County, Ohio. He attended the common schools of the day and served his apprenticeship in clockmaking to Richard Chester of Hanover, Pennsylvania. The town of Hanover was located on an important trade route to Baltimore and Chester had an established business there. In 1784, Jacob is recorded as being married and living on Frederick Street. In 1788 he is listed in the tax records as a clockmaker and in 1797, Hostetter becomes a member of the General Assembly. His serviced lasted until 1802 and he served as a Democrat. From 1802 through 1823 he is listed as operating a brass foundry. He also served in the U.S. House of Representatives in 1818 through 1821. In 1825, Hostetter moves from York County to Ohio. Numerous clocks have been recorded. Eight day as well as 30 hour versions have been seen. A 30 hour example is in the collection of the Historical Society of Carroll County in Westminster, Maryland.

Edward Howard of Boston, Massachusetts.

The E. Howard Clock Company has an outstanding reputation for making high quality weight driven wall timepieces, standing regulators, public clocks and electro-mechanical master and watchman clocks.

Edward Howard was born in Hingham, Massachusetts on October 6, 1813 and died in Dorchester, Massachusetts on March 4, 1904. He began his clock making career serving an apprenticeship with Aaron Willard Junior of Boston and then worked for Henry Plympton, a balance maker in Boston. Soon, in 1847, he formed a partnership with another Aaron Willard Jr. apprentice David P. Davis. Together, under the firm name Howard & Davis, they began to make fine wall clocks, regulators, scales and balances. Soon they took on Luther S. Stephenson and the Henry Hinckley and others. Their interests in business expanded or evolved into the manufacture of tower clocks, sewing machines, fire engines, watches and bicycles. Davis left the firm and Howard continued with his clock interests. The e. Howard Clock Company grew and continued in various forms. It continued to build on it’s international reputation for making high quality items. He eventually retired in 1882.

For a more in depth reading of E. Howard and his various businesses, please read Paul Foley’s book, Willard’s Patent Time Pieces.

Howard & Davis of Boston, Massachusetts.

The Howard & Davis firm was formed in Boston, Massachusetts by Edward Howard and David Potter Davis some time in 1842. This partnership lasted approximately ten years. In 1844 through 1847, Luther S. Stephenson joined the partnership which was then called Stephenson, Howard & Davis. It is now currently thought that the Howard & Davis name was not used until after Stephenson left. It is reported that both Howard and Davis served their apprenticeship in clockmaking to Aaron Willard Jr. of Roxbury, Massachusetts. Together, they built a reputation for building very high quality items which included in addition to various forms of clocks, fire pumpers, postal or balance scales, and other measuring devices. In 1856, the Howard and Davis firm dissolved yet Howard continued to use the name until 1857. It appears David Davis continued the business alone at a location on 15 Washington Street. Edward Howard formed the E. Howard Clock Company and enjoyed many prosperous years making clocks and latter watches until he retired in 1881.

Alfred Huntington of St. Albans, Vermont.

Alfred Henry Huntington was born in Addison, Vermont on April 25th, 1805. He was the son of Dea. Jonathan Huntington. It is reported that he trained as an apprentice to Curtis and Dunning of Burlington for a 4 year indenture beginning in 1821 at the age of 16. In 1825, Alfred moved to St. Albans and worked as a journeyman, watch repairer and jeweler for Hiram Eaton. It appears Eaton owned and operated a retail shop. In October of 1834, Huntington begins to advertise on his own. His shop was located one door north of J.R. Danforth’s hotel. He advertised that he could repair clocks and watches, as well as jewelry and most other articles of this nature. In 1842, he took on a Mr. Ames as a partner. This relationship lasted only two years. In 1847 Huntington hired Charles Wyman as a journeyman. Wyman had considerable watchmaking experience. With in two years they became partners in Huntington & Wyman. This business last seven years or until Huntington retired in 1856 A. H. Huntington died in February 16th, 1872.

Abel Hutchins of Concord, New Hampshire.

Abel Hutchins worked with his older brother Levi in partnership from 1786 through 1803. Both boys were born in Harvard, Massachusetts the sons of Colonel Gordon Hutchins. Levi was born on August 17, 1761 and Abel was born two years later in March. Both men lived into their nineties. On December 6, 1777, the brothers entered into an apprenticeship with Simon Willard of Grafton, Massachusetts. At this time Levi was sixteen and Abel was fourteen years old. In 1780, Levi moved to Abington, CT for a period of approximately eight months to learn some watchmaking skills. He then moved to Concord, New Hampshire and opened a shop on Main Street. He was the first clockmaker to manufacture brass clocks in New Hampshire. Abel worked for a short time in Roxbury after his commitment to Simon was over. Abel is listed in the Roxbury tax assessor’s records in 1784. He was also appointed a fireward with Aaron Willard and Elijah Ward. It is in Roxbury that he married Elizabeth Partridge in January of 1786. Two of her sisters also married clockmakers Aaron Willard and Elnathan Taber. Shortly after their marriage, it appears that Abel moved to Concord, NH and formed a partnership with his bother sometime in 1786. Here they began what must have been a very productive business of making clocks. In 1803, Abel bought out his brothers interests in the partnership and continued making clocks in the same location. The shop was destroyed by fire on November 25th, 1817. Abel built the Phoenix Hotel on the same site. It opened for business on January 1st, 1819. He prospered as a innkeeper until he retired in 1832.

Abel Hutchins of Concord, New Hampshire. A country tall case clock.

This is a fine country maple case tall clock made by Abel Hutchins of Concord, New Hampshire. This case is nicely… read more

Levi Hutchins of Concord, New Hampshire.

Levi Hutchins was born in Harvard, Massachusetts on August 17, 1761 to Gordon and Holly Hutchins. He died peacefully in Concord at the age of 93 on the 13th of June 1855. His remains were interned in the Friends’ burial-ground in Concord. This was a society he with drew from several years before his death. Levi’s brother Abel was born in March of 1763. He also died in Concord on April 4th, 1853. Both men lived into their nineties and lived long prosperous lives. I have listed some of Levi’s life’s highlights below.

Levi was old enough to be involved in the American Revolution. . In April of 1775, he served as a fifer under his fathers command and was a first hand witness of the burning of Charlestown. In September of that year, he enlisted in Captain Lewis’ Company, in Colonel Varnum’s Regiment, under General Green.

In the spring of 1776, Levi marched to New York in an effort to protect the city and was posted in Brooklyn and then later at Red Hook. Red Hook is an island located 4 miles from New York an is such situated to protect the harbor until the defeat of the Americans in the Battle of Long Island.

Levi was well educated. He attended Byfield Academy for 1 year and Andover Academy for 2 quarters. He was then recruited as a school teacher and taught in the towns of Tewksbury, Pembroke and Ashburnham, Massachusetts. ( I am always amazed at the amount of travel individuals took on in their lives during this period in our infant Nation.)

On December 6, 1777, the two brothers entered into an apprenticeship with the ingenious Simon Willard of Grafton, Massachusetts. At this time Levi was sixteen and Abel was fourteen years of age. After serving their 3 year indenture to Simon, Levi traveled to Abington, CT to serve an eight month apprenticeship in the watch repair trade. Their father had moved from Harvard to Concord in 1772 purchasing land and buildings and commenced as a storekeeper. In 1786, the two brothers move to Concord, New Hampshire and set up shop on Main Street in the central village. Their first shop was located very near the present railroad passenger depot not far from the junction of the Merrimack River and the roads from Boston, Portsmouth and the Connecticut Valley. The shop was in the back of a three story dwelling house which was jointly owned an occupied by their families.

On February 23rd 1789, Levi married Phoebe Hanaford daughter of Benjamin and Ruth Hanaford of Haverhill, MA. They had ten children children together. Levi made each one of them a clock before he passed.

In 1793, Levi and Abel purchased a farm together three miles away on the western side of Rattlesnake Hill. Here they continued to manufacturer clocks and to farm. In 1807, their partnership was dissolved. Levi received the farm. Abel retained the house, shop and the parcel of land in which they were built on. (On tuesday, November 25, 1817 these building were consumed by fire. Two years later, Abel erects the Phoenix Hotel.) In 1808, Levi purchased a house on 70 acres including an apple orchard, a dilapidated fort, a large barn, woodshed and later a saw mill located on Long Pond in West Parish or West Concord Village.

After the War of 1812, about 1815, Levi built a large building and set up five looms to manufacturer cloth. The cloth business lasted three years before it became unprofitable and sold off. One room in this barn was used for clockmaking. Levi continued to work on brass clock for 20 years. The saw mill operated for 50 years.

Levi & Abel Hutchins of Concord, New Hampshire.

Levi Hutchins was born in Harvard, Massachusetts on August 17, 1761. His brother Abel was born two years later in March. Both men lived into their nineties. Gordon Hutchins, their father, served in the Revolutionary War as a captain. He organized a Company from the Concord area that fought at Bunker Hill.  Levi was enlisted as the fifer.  His father fearing for Levi’s safety, forced him to stay on high ground in Medford.  Levi witnessed the burning of Charlestown wanted to see action himself, so he enlisted in Captain Lewis, Company and was taken into the mess. After the war, he was placed in school and later became a school teacher. On December 6th, 1777, the brothers both entered into an apprenticeship with Simon Willard of Grafton, Massachusetts. At this time Levi was sixteen and Abel was fourteen years old. They returned to Concord New Hampshire some time before 1784. Levi and Able Hutchins were in business together making clocks for some Twenty one years (1786-1807).

Levi & Abel Hutchins of Concord, New Hampshire

This is a very good example of a cherry case tall clock made by New Hampshire’s premier clockmakers, Levi and Able… read more

Ithaca Clock Company of Ithaca, New York.

The Ithaca Calendar clock Company was formed in 1865 to manufacture clocks with calendar mechanisms. It was located in Ithaca, New York. Henry B. Horton applied for and was granted a patent on April 18, 1865. This patent was improved several times over its life span. This clock venture ended its operations due to bankruptcy on March 14, 1917.

Ithaca NO. 1 Regulator.

This is a very attractive wall clock. It is cataloged as the No. 1 Regulator and was made by the Ithaca… read more

Joseph Ives of Bristol, Connecticut and Brooklyn, New York.

Joseph Ives was born on September 21, 1782. He was one of six children born to Amasa Ives who married into the Roberts family of Bristol, Connecticut. Gideon Roberts is recorded as the first clockmaker to have worked Bristol and it is now thought that he trained his five sons in clockmaking and possibly trained Joseph and his brothers in the trade as well. They all would have been trained before Gideon died of typhoid fever in 1813.

It appears the Joseph Ives began making wooden geared clocks clocks about 1811 in East Bristol and shortly thereafter, he moved to Bristol and continued in the trade. The type of clocks being manufactured were called “wag-on-the wall” or hang ups.” These were sold across the countryside by peddlers who could carry a small number of them on horse back. A hang up consisted of a movement, dial, hands, weights and pendulum. They were general sold without cases because of the added cost and the difficulty in transportation. As a result most cases were made locally if one could afford to have one built. Ives clocks are distinctive in that they typically feature a rolling lantern pinions instead of leaf pinions in their movement design . This was an Ives improvement that was patented.

By 1820, Eli terry was enjoying great success in selling his 30 hour wooden geared shelf clocks of his own design. Terry’s clocks were powered by weights and Ives began to experiment with a spring powered version having roller pinions attached to a wooden movement. Due to financial difficulties, Joseph moves to Brooklyn, New York about 1825 and is working on Poplar Street. Here he begins the production of a movement that is constructed with rolled brass strips which are then riveted together to form the movement frame. Roller pinions and the leaf spring power is also used. The case of these clocks have a Ducan Phyfe furniture influence.

In 1830, Ives creditors catch up with him again and he on the verge of being sent to debtors prison. John Birge hears of this and travels from Bristol to Brooklyn to settle his debts and to persuaded Ives to return to Connecticut to make clocks. First with C. & L.C. Ives who were using his strap frame design and then with John Birge under Birge & Fuller name. This company used the leaf or wagon spring power in many of their clocks. This design of power was also patented by Ives.

Joseph Ives sold the rights to his patents and continued to work in the clock fields under various firms. He was never financially successful but is credited as being one of the most ingenious Connecticut horologists. Joseph dies in 1862.

For a more complete description of Joseph Ives and his working career, please read, The Contributions of Joseph Ives to Connecticut Clock Technology 1810-1862 written by Kenneth Roberts.

Joseph Ives of Brooklyn, New York. The Brooklyn Model shelf clock.

The Brooklyn Model was made between the years of 1825 and 1830. Joseph Ives had moved from Bristol, Connecticut to Brooklyn… read more

Joseph Ives tall case clock.

This is an important tall case clock having a wooden geared movement made by Joseph Ives in Bristol, Connecticut. This is… read more

Anthony Janzsen of Amsterdam

Anthony Janszen is a listed Maker. He is listed as being bon in 1730 and was at work in 1750 through 1800. He is also listed in the register as one of the most important shopkeepers in Amsterdam in 1767. He is described as a watchmaker located on the corner of Haarlemmerdijk and the Korte Prinsengracht.

Antony Janszen

213005 An impressive long case clock with brass composite dial signed Anthony Janszen / Amsterdam. It is very unusual to find… read more

Jacob Jones of Pittsfield, New Hampshire.

Jacob Jones was born on December 30, 1749 in Kingston, New Hampshire. He was the son of John Jones (1724-1815) and Hannah Dow (1728-1806). Jacob had a Brother John Jr. who is also listed as a clockmaker. Jacob married Mary Dow. They had at least one son, Jacob Jr. who is also listed as a clockmaker. Jacob dies in Pittsfield on July 25th, 1839. Charles Parsons reports in his book, New Hampshire Clockmakers, that fifteen tall case examples are known to have survived by this Maker.

Thomas Joyce of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Currently, very little is known of Thomas Joyce the Clockmaker. He is listed as working in two Philadelphia locations. In 1821 and 1822 he worked at 242 S. 6th Street which is very near today’s Washington Square. In 1823 he moved to 123 Plum Street and worked there until 1825.

Thomas Joyce of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

This wonderful mahogany veneered case tall clock features excellent woods, typical Pennsylvania proportions and a colorfully painted moon phase dial. The… read more

Allen Kelley

Allen Kelley of Sandwich, Massachusetts.

Allen Kelley was born in Yarmouth, Massachusetts on November 14th, 1791. He was a Quaker and served his apprenticeship under the Quaker clockmaker Joshua Wilder of Hingham. By 1813 Kelley is recorded to be on his own and working as a clockmaker of Sandwich, Massachusetts. From here he moved to several other locations in the Southeastern Massachusetts region. Some of the towns include Provincetown in 1819 – 1820, Nantucket in 1825, New Bedford in 1834 and back to Sandwich in 1852. He died there on October 13th, 1876. He was 84 years young. Allen Kelley is listed as a clockmaker, watchmaker, silversmith and a jeweler. Tall clocks and Massachusetts Shelf clocks are known.

Allen Kelley of Sandwich, Massachusetts

This is a diminutive inlaid mahogany case measuring 7 feet 4 inches tall and exhibiting very delicate proportions. This case is… read more

Allen Kelley of Sandwich, Massachusetts.

This is a diminutive inlaid mahogany case measuring 7 feet 4 inches tall and exhibiting very delicate proportions. This case is… read more

John Kennard of Newfields, New Hampshire

John Kennard was born in Kittery, Maine in 1782. He was one of nine children born to Timothy Kennard and Abigail Stevens who married September 8th, 1779. John is thought to have learned clockmaking in Portsmouth, NH. On July 3, 1806, he married Sarah Ewer daughter of James and Drusilla (Ewer) Burleigh. They moved around New Hampshire, living in Nashua and then in Concord before moving to Newfields in 1812. In Newfields they occupied the Palmer House. Here he made clocks and kept a store. He was postmaster in 1822 through 1824. He served as Town Clerk, Selectman and the State Representative. In 1823, John built the Kennard House on Piscassie Street and began a foundry with Temple Paul and the Drakes. They sold out in 1834. John died Jan 14,1861. Tall clocks, banjo clocks and a surveyor’s quarter circle with compass are known.

George Roland Smith Killiam of Pawtucket, Rhode Island.

George Roland Smith Killiam – Born June 11, 1874 – Died August 10, 1937. Killiam operated a clock shop located at 8 Baptist Street in Pawtucket, RI. He advertised this clock for sale in 1904 for $48.00. For more information on this maker see National Association of Watch and Clock Collectors Bulletin No. 388, October 2010.

Benjamin B. Lewis of Bristol, Connecticut.

Benjamin B. Lewis was born in 1818 and died in 1890. He is best known for designing a perpetual calendar mechanism while working as a Jeweler in Huron, Ohio. In 1859, he moved to Bristol, Connecticut to find a manufacturer of his design. The firm Burwell & Carter first manufactured the mechanism in 1859 until 1862. Lewis had applied for an patent which was granted in on February 4, 1862. He continued to improve the design and patent those improvements in 1864, 1868 and 1881. He supplied his mechanisms to L.F. & W.W. Carter in 1862 through 1868 and then to the Welch, Spring & Company from 1868 to 1884. Their clocks sold well and Lewis became quite wealthy. In 1870 he form a partnership with his son Charles S. Lewis under the firm name of B.B. Lewis & Son in Bristol. This venture did not last long.

Little & Eastman of Boston, Massachusetts

Joseph Eastman of the Chelsea Clock Company fame and Henry C. Little provided the clockmaking know how to this short lived firm (1906-1907). As a result, we have seen very few of their clocks in the marketplace. Those that have been seen are usually very similar to the form of a Chelsea no., 1 or the Seth Thomas No., 2 variety. Interestingly, a gilt lyre wall clock has been recorded as being found. A surviving catalog for this firm is not recorded. This short lived venture was set up like the Vermont Clock Company’s operation. The clocks produced were in general very good quality.

Little & Eastman of Boston, Massachusetts.

The example pictured here, is quite decorative and is in wonderful original condition. The case is considered standard size measuring 33.75… read more

Benjamin Lord of Rutland, Vermont.

Benjamin Lord was born in Norwich, Connecticut on October 10, 1770 the son of Ebenezer and Temperance (Edgerton). He is first listed as a silversmith in 1793 when he advertised in the Western Star in Pittsfield, Massachusetts opposite the meeting house on the road to Lanesborough in 1796. It is recorded that in 1797, Benjamin moved into Rutland, Vermont and with in a few short months has formed a partnership with Nichols Goddard. Benjamin married Fanny Buel on January 28, 1799 in Convetry, Connecticut. Together, they had at least six children while putting roots down in this town. He becomes involved with public affairs and serves as town clerk in 1803 – 1813 and again in 1815 – 1826. He was a Captain in the local militia. In 1808, he is thought to have trained his nephew John Bliss as a clockmaker. Bliss becomes a well documented chronomometer maker in New York. Benjamin died on April 23, 1843 in Athens, Georgia.

Lord & Goddard of Rutland, Vermont.

The partnership of Lord & Goddard was first advertised in July 1997. Their shop was located a few rods north of the Rutland Court House just opposite Messrs Pomeroy & Hooker’s store. At this location they advertised the manufacture of musical clocks and most kinds of gold and silverware. (Rutland Herald 7-3-1797.) The shop was moved in 1800 to the shop formerly occupied by Storer & Wilmont. This shop was located approximately 15 rods northwest from the Court House. Lord & Goddard’s partnership lasted approximately eight years and was dissolved on April 26th, 1805. A notice was placed in the Rutland Herald on this date. It appears they stayed close friends as their families remained close and involved with each other.

The tall case clocks that have been found signed by Lord & Goddard have the following numbers recorded…. 72, 75, 87, 95, 97, 98, 106, 111 and 113. Tall clocks signed by Nichols only include 124, 125, 144 and 150.

Lord & Goddard Rutland, Vermont. No. 98.

This is a wonderful inlaid cherry case tall clock having a painted dial signed by the Rutland, Vermont partnership of Lord… read more

Joseph Loring of Sterling, Massachusetts.

Joseph Loring was born in Lancaster, Massachusetts on July 19, 1768 and died in Sterling, Massachusetts on January 31, 1846 at 78 years of age. Joseph is listed in the Sterling town histories as a clockmaker as early as 1792. He also ran a general store which was was located on the corner of Main Street and Kendall Hill Road. This general store later purchased by the Estabrook family who continued to operate the business for many years to follow. Joseph is said to have trained Daniel Holmes as a clockmaker and it appears that he worked for him as a journeyman in 1801 – 1802. Loring’s account book covering the years 1791-1812 is in the Collection at AAS. It reveals a variety of activity including business relationships between Benjamin Willard, Gardner Parker and Able Stowell. Joseph Loring made tall case clocks and shelf clocks. He purchased a number of tall clock cases from John Hill of Leominster. We have also seen an Massachusetts shelf clock that has a cabinetmakers label pasted inside the case that reads, “C. Simmons / cabinetmaker.” By the early 1820’s, chair production in the town of Sterling took off and soon 70,000 chairs were made there annually. Loring became very much involved in chair production. By 1845, Joseph’s estate near Sterling, MA contained about 70 acres of first rate land equally divided into mowing, pasturing and tillage with the buildings theron, a large two story house, 20 by 30 barn and two sheds. Water was provided by a never failing spring piped to the house via lead pipes. A chair and paint shop with small dwelling house was adjoined.

Joseph Loring of Sterling, Massachusetts.

This is a fine inlaid cherry case Massachusetts Shelf Clock with kidney shaped dial made by Joseph Loring of Sterling, Massachusetts.… read more

Marshall & Adams of Seneca Falls, New York.

The firm of Marshall & Adams located in Seneca Falls, New York was formed in 1834. Chauncey Marshall a businessman / financier and Elmer W. Adams a clockmaker originating from Connecticut produced wood and brass movement clocks from 1834 through 1836. It is reported that at one point, they did approximately $40,000 per year in sales. Their sales model was to sell clocks via peddlers that traveled West.

Marshall & Adams of Seneca Falls, New York.

RR-10 Marshall & Adams of Seneca Falls, New York. This is an outstanding example of a Column and Cornice shelf clock.… read more

John McNiesh, (Sr.) of New York City.

John McNiesh (Sr.) was born a native of Scotland sometime around 1777. At the age of 35, he immigrated to New York city in 1812. At this time, he had been trained as a clock and watchmaker. He was married to Janet (Drisdale) McNiesh and had six children. Their first child, Jane, died in Scotland in infancy. Their second child, also named Jane, grew up in New York and married John Phyfe of that city. The third child, Elizabeth did not marry. She lived to be 86 years old. The fourth child, Janet married John Ferguson of New York City. John, the fifth son, was educated in New York and was trained by his father as a clock and watchmaker. His first shop was located on Wall Street and the corner of William Street. Successful, he remained there until 1842 when he relocated to Brooklyn and emerged himself in the mercantile trade. In 1844 he retired the family homestead at Woodrow in the Borough of Richmond. He died on January 12, 1882 at Huguenot Park. Their last child, James died at Woodrow in 1851. He did not marry. John (Sr.) is listed in the NYC Directories as a Watchmaker in 1820 and 1835. He became a naturalized citizen on February 5th, 1828. His occupation was listed as a merchant. He and Janet resided on Water Street for a number of years. They later moved to Woodrow, borough of Richmond, where the family purchased a farm and homestead. John passed away in 1846.

Cornelius Miller

Cornelius Miller was the son of the now well known Elizabeth Town clockmaker Aaron Miller. Aaron was one of the earliest clockmakers in the state of New Jersey advertising and constructing clocks as early as 1747. Very little is known of son Cornelius. It is thought that his father trained him as a clockmaker. Aaron also trained his son-in law-Isaac Brokaw who produced numerous clocks. Cornelius on the other produced very few. I am not currently aware of another Cornelius Miller tall case example to have survived. Cornelius Miller died in 1779, the same year his father past.

George Monks (II) & Son

George Monks (II) is listed in Brain Loomes new book, “Watchmakers & Clockmakers of the World.” Loomes lists two George Monks. The first is George was born in 1750 and died in 1815. His son, George (II) the maker of this example was born in 1775 and died in 1827. Both father and son worked in Prescott. The town of Prescott is located 7 miles East of Liverpool in Lancaster County. This clock certainly has many of the midland attributes.

Benjamin Morrill of Boscawen, New Hampshire.

Benjamin Morrill was born on January 16, 1794 and died April 21, 1857.  He was one of six children born to Samuel Morrill and Sarah Atkinson, Benjamin was their fifth child.  It is summarized that he was a practical man and that he was educated.  His work demonstrates a creative skill in mechanical matters.  It is not presently know who trained Benjamin as a clockmaker and 1816, Benjamin is recorded as setting up his shop.  Benjamin’s oldest sister Judith, married Joseph Chadwick.  He was also a clockmaker from the same town and was seven years older than Benjamin.  On November 22, 1818, Benjamin marries his first of two wives, Mehetable Eastman.  She was the daughter of Simeon and Anna  (Kimball) Eastman of Landiff, New Hampshire.  They had two children before she died on July 6, 1828.  Benjamin remarried six months later to Mary Choate of Derry, New Hampshire.  Together, they also had two children and lived in a plain house that was built by his grandfather.  His grandfather, the Reverend Robie Morrill, graduated from Harvard College in 1755.  Benjamin Died April 21, 1857.  

As a Clockmaker, Benjamin made numerous clocks.  These included tall case clocks, shelf clocks, banjo clocks and mirror clocks.  Interestingly, he is credited with developing the New Hampshire clock form.  Many of the mirror clocks found today, feature his “Wheel Barrel” style movement.  Benjamin is also thought to have made at least four tower clocks.  Interestingly, none of these examples are signed but, all are similar in style.  The documented examples are as follows. One example was installed in the tower in the First Parish Meeting House located in Dover, New Hampshire.  A second clock was installed the tower of the Congregational Church in Henniker, New Hampshire in 1835.  This clock is now on display at the American Clock and Watch Museum in Bristol, Connecticut.  A third clock is reportably located in its original location in Orford, New Hampshire.  Later in life when clockmaking became less profitable, Benjamin developed an interest in music.  He then began to manufacture various musical instruments and scales.

Benjamin Morrill of Boscawen, New Hampshire. A New Hampshire Mirror Clock.

This is a fine example of New Hampshire Mirror clock made by Benjamin Morrill of Boscawen, New Hampshire. The case is… read more

Jacob Morse of Westfield, Massachusetts

Jacob Morse was born the son of Lt. Edmund Morse of Hempstead, New York and Rachel Rowell of Amesbury and Essex, Massachusetts on March 31, 1751. He died at the age of 68 in Westfield, Massachusetts in 1819. Jacob was married twice. His first wife was Naomi Sykes of Westfield. They were married sometime about 1774 and had 3 children. Clarissa was born in 1775, James in 1777 and Harvey in 1779. In 1780, Jacob married Metitable Williams of Westfield. They had six children. Elizabeth was born about 1781, Henry in 1790, Edmund in 1785, Theodore in 1787, Mary in 1789 and Naomi in 1791. Jacob is listed as working in Westfield, Massachusetts on the corner of Main Street and Broad Street about 1790 through 1800. Over the years, we have owned several other tall case clocks made by this Maker. Clocks, cases, a gear cutting engine and a lathe are all mentioned in his estate inventory.

Jacob Morse of Westfield, Massachusetts

This birch case tall clock was made by Jacob Morse of Westfield, Massachusetts. This case features typical New England proportions and… read more

Samuel (II) Mulliken of Newburyport, Massachusetts.

Samuel Mulliken II was born in Haverhill, Massachusetts the son of John Mulliken and Susanna Huse (1735-1820) on April 9th,1765. He is a member of a very important family of American Clockmakers. It is thought that he was trained by his distant cousin Jonathan Mulliken (1746-1782) of Newburyport. Jonathan died in 1782. Samuel married Jonathan’s widow, Susannah (Pearson) Mulliken a year later in 1783. Samuel’s Newburyport clockshop was located on State Street. Here he developed business ties with the Willards from Roxbury agreeing to sell Simon’s Patented Clock Jacks. In 1789, Samuel move from Newburyport to Lynn, Massachusetts and then the following year to Salem, Massachusetts. In Salem, Samuel advertises himself as a merchant. In 1796 he moves back to Lynn and becomes the towns postmaster in 1803. Samuel dies in Lynn in 1847.

Samuel (I) Mulliken of Bradford, Massachusetts. (1722-1777)

Samuel Mulliken (1722 -1777) of Bradford, Massachusetts was a member of a very important family of American clock makers. Very few American Pre-Revolutionary clocks were made in this country and fewer survive.

Nathaniel Mulliken of Lexington, Massachusetts.

Nathaniel was a member of a very important family of American clock makers. He was born in Bradford, Massachusetts on August 8, 1722. His parents were John and Mary (Poore) Mulliken of Bradford, Massachusetts. It is thought that he served his clockmaking apprenticeship to his uncle Jonathan Mulliken (b. circa 1701) who was working in Bradford as early as 1735. Nathaniel also worked in Bradford until approximately 1751 when he married Lydia Stone and settled in Lexington. Together they had at least two children that also made clocks. Nathaniel Jr., was born on March 30th, 1752 and Joseph was born in on April 9th, 1765 in the same town. Nathaniel live and worked in Lexington until his death in 1767. It is thought that he trained other clockmakers besides his sons. Benjamin Willard moved to Lexington to learn how to make brass clocks. Daniel Balch of Newbury, Massachusetts also learned the trade from him. Nathaniel’s son John (born 1754) was a cabinetmaker and is recorded as making clock cases. At Nathaniel Sr.’s death, the business in Lexington was continued on by Nathaniel Jr. He maintained this business until the shop and the house were burned to the ground on April 17, 1775 by British troops while retreating back to Boston. A signed Mulliken movement was reportedly found in the bag of a deceased British soldier lying on the Boston road.

Asa Munger of Auburn, New York.

Asa Munger was born in Granby, Massachusetts on October 14, 1777. He grew up in Ludlow, MA as the oldest of fifteen siblings. Here in Ludlow, the period of 1799 through 1803, he is listed in the town records as a goldsmith and making a small number of both wood and brass made clocks. It is unclear where he received his training. Munger sold his property in Ludlow in November of 1803. He moved to New York state and finial settled in Auburn sometime between 1815 and 1817. Asa was involved with several clock entities. These include: Munger & Gillmore’s, Munger & Benedict circa 1825 and A. Munger & Co circa 1833-1834. The firm Munger & Benedict, is thought to have been one of if not the first to sign a labor contract with a state penitentiary. This was for the use of convict labor. The firm Munger & Co., was comprised of Asa Munger, Thaddeus Benedict and Clarke Beers Hotchkiss and used prison labor in the construction of their clocks. Munger left this venture in 1834. Hotchkiss and Benedict continued. Munger continued to operate a jewelry store business and clock operation. In 1836, Asa takes on his son in partnership as Asa Munger & Son. Asa dies in March of 1851. Tall case clocks, pillar & scroll style clocks and empire shelf clocks of various case styles are known. For a more complete Bibliography on this maker, please read, “An Empire in Time. Clocks & Clockmakers of Pratt New York” written by G. Russell Outsell, Helen Bryce & Collaborators.

Asa Munger of Auburn, New York.

This very distinctive looking clock was made By Asa Munger in Auburn, New York. This case form is often called a… read more

William Munroe of Concord and Boston, Massachusetts.

William Munroe was born in Roxbury, Massachusetts in 1778. He was the third son of Daniel Monroe who was born in Lexington. Daniel’s father Jedediah Munroe died in the battle of Lexington. Daniel’s mother, Abigail Parker of Roxbury was the eldest daughter of Jonathan Parker, a farmer in the town of Roxbury and was one of the Patriots who enlisted in destroying the tea in Boston Harbor at the commencement of the America Revolution. He also had ties to the revolution in that he was involved in the Boston Tea party.

It is thought that William had limited education. At the age of thirteen, he was employed or placed with grandfather Parker to assist on his farm. William was not a strong boy and disliked manual labor. At the age of fourteen, he was placed with Mr. Millis who was a wheelwright and worked on Roxbury Street. Here William had a similar experience with hard work and lasted only five months. He then went off to Dorchester to apprentice to Major Stephen Badlam Esqr. Badlam operated a successful cabinet business. William stayed here for two years sawing veneers, turning a lathe and farming. Next, he was employed by a Mr. John Paddleford who was a cabinetmaker located on Roxbury Street. William stayed with him until he was 17.5 years old and moved on to Taunton to work with a the cabinetmaker Nehemiah Munroe. Nehemiah had a good business on the same street. William recalls that Nehemiah was a hard person to work for and he stayed with him until he was 21. Here he learned carving and made the best quality furniture. In June of 1800, his brother Daniel convinced him to set up shop in Concord to make clock cases for him. He set up his first shop in Mr. William Heywoods cabinet shop. By July of 1802, it is recorded that he made 52 clock case up to that date. In July, he was taken in as a partner in his brothers business until 1804. After this, he made anything for anybody including clock and timepiece cases, gun stocks, bedsteads, tables, coffins, sideboards, etc. On Sept. 19, 1805,William married Patty Stone the daughter of the architect Captain John Stone. John Stone designed the Charles River Bridge.

Nathaniel Munroe of Concord, Massachusetts and Baltimore Maryland.

Nathaniel was born in Roxbury, Massachusetts on June 21, 1777. It is recorded that he learned clock making from Abel Hutchins of Concord, New Hampshire. Abel was an early apprentice of Simon Willard’s. Nathaniel was in business with his brother Daniel between 1800-1807. He is listed as a Clockmaker and a Brass Founder. In 1808, he joined Samuel Whiting and from the partnership Munroe & Whiting. In 1817 he moved south to Baltimore and continued to make clocks in what appears to be small numbers.

Daniel Munroe & Company of Concord, Massachusetts.

It is recorded that the firm of Daniel Munroe & Co., was comprised of Clockmakers Daniel Jr., and Nathaniel Munroe and their younger brother William Munroe was the cabinet or casemaker. This partnership began in 1798 with just Daniel and Nathaniel. In about 1800, William’s two brothers convinced him to move to Concord in order to build cases for their clocks. They formed a partnership and he was given a conttact in 1801 as a full partner in their business which lasted until 1804. Tall clocks and Massachusetts shelf clocks are known.

Daniel Munroe Junior of Concord and Boston, Massachusetts.

Daniel Munroe Jr. was born in Roxbury on July 13, 1775. He learned clockmaking from Simon Willard and served a successful seven year apprenticeship under him. Simon wrote in a letter dated July 13, 1796 that described Daniel as, “ … one of the best workman in America.“ After serving his apprenticeship, Daniel worked for a short time as a journeyman clock maker in Roxbury in Willards shop before moving to Concord, Massachusetts sometime before 1798. Here he kept a shop opposite the Clothing Mill and worked as a clockmaker and silversmith. On November 29, 1804 he married Sarah Dakin in Concord. In 1839, he moved to New York City. He then moves back to Boston in 1841 through 1856. Daniel Died in Boston on October 21, 1859.

David Norrie

David Norrie is listed in Brain Loomes book, “Watchmakers & Clockmakers of the World.” Loomes lists Norrie as working in several locations. He is first listed in Canongate, Edinburgh in 1787 when he was freed from his clock master. He is then listed in New Quay, Leith (Scotland) until his death in 1801. His business wass succeeded by his widow till 1811.

Eardley Norton of London, England.

Eardley Norton is listed as working at 49 St. John’s Street, Clerkenwell between 1762 and 1794. He was member of the Clockmakers’ Company being freed in 1762 an enjoyed a reputation as a very skilled mechanic. He is best known for making complex timepieces, sometimes with musical and astronomical movements for the export markets. This included Turkey and the Far East. The most notable of which may be his four dial astronomical clock which he made to stand in the library of Buckingham House (now Buckingham Palace, London). In addition, there are clocks made by him in the Royal Collection, numerous museums worldwide and some of the world’s finest collections including a bracket clock in the Virginia Museum, a very small cartel clock in the National Museum of Stockholm, a marine chronometer in the Ilbert Collection and an elaborate automaton clock with organ in the Palace Museum located in Peking. Norton made an astronomical clock for George III which still stands in Buckingham Palace. On his death, his business was taken over by the partnership of Gravell and Tolkien.

John Osgood of Andover, MA and Haverhill, NH.

It is reported John Osgood was born in Andover, Massachusetts on June 20, 1770. He moved to Bradford, MA where he served his clockmakers apprenticeship to his uncle Michael Carlton of that town. Osgood returned to Andover sometime in early 1790. Here he married a Sarah Porter of Haverhill who came from Boxford (MA). They had a total of 6 children. In 1795, John Moved his family to Haverhill, NH where he continued to make many clocks and performed silversmithing and did watch and jewelry repair. Carlton had established a cabinet shop across the river. Osgood’s shop was located 200 feet to the North of his own home on Main street. It was a one story building with a divided front door. He was successful. Over the years, he employed several apprentices. He often bartered for services. His account books record that he squared with wheat, corn, oats and salt pork. John Osgood was remembered by a grandson as a friendly, warm person. He was clean shaven, smallish in stature and inclined to stoop while walking with a limp. (One knee suffered from a white swelling as a child. The joint was useless.) He was a devout man, “bald from age.” John Osgood died in his own home on July 29, 1840 reportably of consumption. At his death he owned his house, shop and a good farm east of the village where his brother in law Billy Porter lived.

John Osgood of Andover, MA and Haverhill, NH.

It is reported John Osgood was born in Andover, Massachusetts on June 20, 1770. He moved to Bradford, MA where he served his clockmakers apprenticeship to his uncle Michael Carlton of that town. Osgood returned to Andover sometime in early 1790. Here he married a Sarah Porter of Haverhill who came from Boxford (MA). They had a total of 6 children. In 1795, John Moved his family to Haverhill, New Hampshire where he continued to make many clocks and performed silversmithing and did watch and jewelry repair. Carlton had established a cabinet shop across the river in Vermont. Osgood’s shop was located 200 feet to the North of his own home on Main street. It was a one story building with a divided front door. He was successful. Over the years, he employed several apprentices. He often bartered for services. His account books record that he squared with wheat, corn, oats and salt pork. John Osgood was remembered by a grandson as a friendly, warm person. He was clean shaven, smallish in stature and inclined to stoop while walking with a limp. (One knee suffered from a white swelling as a child. The joint was useless.) He was a devout man, “bald from age.” John Osgood died in his own home on July 29, 1840 reportably of consumption. At his death he owned his house, shop and a good farm east of the village where his brother in law Billy Porter lived.

John Osgood clocks are often numbered. It appears that he engraved a production number on one of the movement plates. More commonly it can be found on the back plate. To date, we have seen at least 25 examples and counting. The lowest number is 13. The highest number recorded by us is No., 373.

Griffith Owen of Montgomery County, Pennsylvania.

Griffith Owen is a respected clock maker. He was born in 1759. At the age of fourteen, (1773) Owen would have started his apprenticeship under the Philadelphia clock maker Jacob Godshalk by the consent of his Mother, Elizabeth Owen on April 7, 1773. This relationship was convenient due to the fact that Jacob had married Griffith Owen’s sister Elizabeth (Sarah) Owen in December of 1770. Sarah was fourteen years older than her brother Griffith. By 1780, Griffith had earned his journeyman status. In 1781, he took over the family business in Philadelphia due to Jacob’s death. One interesting point worth mentioning is that Godshalk was responsible for the maintenance of the clock located in what is now known as Independence Hall. Owen assumed these responsibilities at this time. Owen advertised that he had several tall case clocks for sale and that he was also engaged in various aspects of the watch business. In 1793, a Yellow Fever epidemic struck the city of Philadelphia. It is thought that in 1794, Owen moved his clock making business to Towamencin Township in Montgomery County as a result of this. He stayed there two years and then moved to Gwynedd Township. This may explain why several examples of his clocks have been found signed with the County location rather than the Township. Griffith is later recorded as living and working in several other nearby locations. He is recorder as have moving back to Philadelphia in 1802 through 1814. Then in 1812 through 1817, he returns to Gywnedd Township, Montgomery County. In 1817 he moves to Hatfield County until 1820. Owen dies in Norristown on April 29, 1820.

Gardner Parker of Westborough, Massachusetts.

Gardner Parker was born in Hubbardston, Massachusetts on March 14th, 1772. He died in Westborough by his own hand on February 16th, 1816. He was the son of Isaac and Marjory Parker. They were originally from Shrewsbury and moved to Hubbardston and then to Westborough in 1777. Gardner married Assenath Sherman of Grafton. They had one child. A son name Perley Parker was born in Grafton and married Betsey Mellen. Gardner is said to have been trained in the art of clockmaking by the Willards. Paul Foley in his book, Willard’s Patent Time Pieces, speculates that he was trained by Benjamin the oldest of the Willard clockmaking brothers. He lists numerous entries where they had an on going business relationship manufacturing clock components. Most of these were charged to Benjamin. In October of 1800, Parker purchases some land in Westborough. He set up a mill at the location that is now called “Parker’s Folly.” It was named this because the dam he constructed in order to hold water back failed. This may have been an attempt to apply water power to clockmaking. Later he advertises the ability of make all types of clocks including tower clocks. One such tower clock was installed in Westborough in 1801, one was installed in Arlington in 1808 and one in Shrewsbury in before 1816. There are also records of his building church organs. Parkers reputation was a man of nervous temperament. He would go days without sleep in order to finish a project. In February of 1816, his mind could longer handle the strain. He shot himself in a fit of despondency.

John Polsey of Boston and Roxbury, Massachusetts.

John Polsey was born in Cumberland, Rhode Island in 1816. It is assumed that he apprenticed as a clockmaker under Aaron Willard Jr. This would have been about the same time when Edward Howard and David P. Davis were receiving the same training. Polsey’s first listing as a clockmaker is found in the 1941 Boston Directory. In 1852 through 1856 he is listed in the Roxbury Directories as the superintendent of the Howard & Davis balance manufactory. In 1858 through 1859 he formed a partnership with Davis as Davis & Polsey & Co. He remained in the same location until 1864 as Polsey & Co. In 1864, he takes a job as the foreman of the plateroom for the Tremont Watch Company. This firm moves to Melrose. Polsey dies in Newton Centre, Massachusetts on October 2nd, 1873.

The Polsey & Co. had a sales room located at No. 74 Water Street but the factory was located in Roxbury. He advertised in 1859 “Manufactures of SUPERIOR CLOCKS, for Churches, Galleries, Banks, Offices, Houses, Schools, Railroad Stations, Factories & Astronomical Regulator Clocks….” Most of what is traded today between collectors follows the forms of the Howard & Davis banjo series and some of their marble faced clocks. Polsey clocks do not turn up very often.

Daniel Porter of Williamstown, Massachusetts.

Daniel Porter was born on July 20, 1775 in East Hartford, Conn. His parents were James Porter Jr. and Sarah (Porter) Porter. His father died when he was just two years old Ezekial Loomis, his Guardian bound him to apprencthice with the Windsor, Conneticut Clockmaker Daniel Burnap. Burnap was known to have great skill as a clockmaker and as an engraver. It is thoguht that he engraved numerous dials for other clockmakers in the region. Burnap is said to have also trained at leats ten others who made clocks. The most famous of which was Eli Terry. Porter arrived at Burnap’s shop on July 20th, 1792 when he was 17 years old and stayed until he was 21. His indenture survives. Daniel first moves from Windsor to Topsfield, MA working as a silversmith and then to Stockbridge, MA as a silversmith and clockmaker. On February 14, 1799, Daniel purchased his house and a lot on Main Street in Williamstown. This was located 10 rods or approximately 160 feet west of a well with a pump in it, and a few rods west of the College. Daniel’s married Polly Badger in 1801. They had two children. Royal Porter, a son, was born Febuary 24, 1801 and died in Charleston, SC on June 13, 1844. He was a graduate of Williams College in 1823 and worked as an editor and properitor of “The American Traveller.” Daniel died a t 35 years of age young age in 1809. His newphew Eli married his widow and took charge of the family. Eli continued to work in the clock trades.

We have sold several tall clocks made by this Maker. A tall case clock with a musical movement is known. Also known is a surveyors compass made by him.

Daniel Porter of Williamstown, Massachusetts.

This is a nicely proportioned inlaid cherry case tall clock. It stands on four nicely formed ogee bracket feet. The base… read more

Adam Pringle

Adam Pringle is listed in Donald Whyte’s Clockmakers and Watchmakers of Scotland. He is listed as working on Bristo Street in 1782 through 1820. In 1782 he married Anne Campbell the daughter of James Campbell of Dunfermline.

Samuel Ranlet of Monmouth, Maine.

Samuel Ranlet was born in Gilmanton, New Hampshire, on March 28, 1780. In 1800 he moved his family to Augusta where it is thought he learned clock making from Benjamin Snow. In 1809 he moved to Monmouth where he settled on a farm and set up his clock business. He made tall clocks as well as banjo clocks, both styles skillfully made. His brother in law Jacob Miller, is thought to have made the wood cases for him. Samuel held the rank of Captain in the Maine Artillery and was in command of a company of men at Fort Edgecomb during the War of 1812. Samuel died at the age of 87.

James Rodgers of New York City.

James Rodgers is a listed as a Clockmaker in several references. Sonya L. & Thomas J. Spitler and Chris H. Bailey lists him in their book, American Clocks Volume 3. American Clockmakers & Watchmakers. A more complete listing can be found in the June 1992 NAWCC Bulletin. Most of the information listed below was research by Fred Shelly (CT).

James Rodgers was born in Scotland in 1801. It appears he was trained in Scotland as a clockmaker before he immigrated to New York City in 1822. He is listed as having several working locations. Some of which include Chatham Street, two locations on Broadway, one at number 410 and the other nearer Canal Street and lastly on the corner of Fulton and Williams Street. Rodgers lists of accomplishments include some fifty tower clocks which include the clock built for the Trinity Church and the example installed in the front entrance of Grand Central Depot in NYC (Both of which have since been replaced), numerous ships clocks and several tall case clocks. Both painted and engraved dial examples have been seen to date. Rodgers was also the first manufacturer of Morse Telegraph instruments. Rodgers died in 1878.

James Rodgers of New York City.

James Ro(d)gers of New York City, New York. This is a beautiful figured mahogany case tall clock that is delicately line… read more

Paul Rogers of Berwick, Maine.

Paul Rogers was born 1752 and died in 1818. He was a Quaker, and belong to a group more properly called the Society of Friends. The Quakers were a sect known for their independence and devotion to hard work and had established small colonies throughout the more rural parts of New England. He was a very productive clockmaker who worked at his trade for nearly forty years. A few notable apprentices to Paul include his son Abner (1777-1809), Reuben Brackett (1761-1867), and John Taber (1796-1859).

John Rogers of Newton, Massachusetts.

John Rogers was born in 1724 and died in Newton on October 19, 1815 at the age of 91. He is also listed as a blacksmith and reportable trained under a Joseph Ward. He maintained two shops. One in Newton and the other in Waltham. He had a number of business dealings with Clockmaker Benjamin Willard. A law suit file against Willard is recorded. The few signed John Rogers clocks we have owned and sold over the years seem to resemble the style of the latter Massachusetts Makers and their competitors. Examples of brass composite dials, an engraved brass dial and painted dial clocks are known.

John Rogers of Newton, Massachusetts

This is a fine cherry case clock that exhibits classic New England proportions. The finish is most likely original to the… read more

John Rogers of Newton, Massachusetts.

John Rogers was born in 1724 and died in Newton on October 19, 1815 at the age of 91. He is… read more

Paul Rogers & Son of Berwick, Maine.

Paul Rogers was born 1752 and died in 1818. He was a Quaker and an active member of the Society of Friends. The Quakers were a sect known for their independence and devotion to hard work. They had established numerous small colonies throughout the more rural parts of New England. He was a very productive clockmaker who worked at his trade for nearly forty years. A few notable apprentices to Paul include his son Abner (1777-1809), Reuben Bracket (1761-1867), and John Taber (1796-1859). We have owned a large number of Paul Rogers clocks.

Abner Rogers was born in 1777 and died in 1809. It is logical to assume that his father Paul trained him in clockmaking. We have owned several Abner Rogers signed tall clocks. These clocks also had iron plates incorporated into the construction of the movement.

Jacob Sargeant of Springfield, Massachusetts.

Jacob Sargeant was born in Mansfield, Connecticut on February 28, 1761. He was the son of Samuel and Hannah ( Baldwin ) Sargeant. He was engaged in watch and clock making as early as 1785. In 1787 he moved to Springfield, Massachusetts and continued to make clocks and to sell jewelry. Here he employed his younger brother Thomas as an apprentice. In October 1795 he advertised in the “Courant,” a Hartford newspaper, that he had moved or “Established his business at the sign of the Golden Watch a few rods South of the State House in Hartford.“ He remained in Hartford until his death in 1843.

Jacob Sargeant of Springfield, Massachusetts

This is a very nice tall case clock made by Jacob Sargeant of Springfield, Massachusetts. This is a nice country cased… read more

John Sawin of Boston, Massachusetts.

John Sawin was born in Roxbury, Massachusetts on September 13th, 1799. It is thought that he was trained as a clockmaker by his uncle Aaron Willard. John was also related to Lemuel Curtis who was a cousin. Throughout his career, John had a number of working relationships. It appears the he worked with Simon Willard in 1819-1820. He is then listed as a journeyman working with Aaron Willard Jr. By 1822, Sawin had formed a partnership with George W. Dyar as Sawin & Dyar. This lasted until 1827. John Continued to make clocks on his own and continued to employe many apprentices and journeyman. The number of signed Swain clocks that survive is today’s marketplace suggests that he was very successful. He advertised that in he made Tower clocks and wall regulators. Wall timepieces, gallery clocks and Massachusetts Shelf clocks have been found. John Sawin is probably best known for creating the lyre form wall timepiece.

John Sawin full striking wall clock. Boston, Massachusetts.

Full striking banjo clocks are very difficult to find in today's marketplace. This is probably due to the fact that they… read more

Joshua Seward of Boston, Massachusetts.

Joshua Seward was born in Portsmouth, New Hampshire on May 5, 1809 and died in Woburn, Massachusetts on July 21, 1885. Current research suggests that he was most likely an apprentice of John Sawin. Sawin was a prolific Boston clockmaker. In 1832, Seward formed a partnership with Alva Skinner under the firm name Skinner & Seward. In May of 1833, Seward advertised working alone. He was then located at 63 Congress Street. By 1836, it appears he gave up clockmaking to operate the livery stable at the Boylston Estate on School Street in Boston. In 1840 through 1842, he lived in Charlestown.

William Sherwin of Buckland, Massachusetts

William Sherwin was born in western part of Franklin County in the small town of Ashfield, Massachusetts on October 26, 1787. It is not known when he moved approximately 5 miles north to the town of Buckland. Buckland was organized on April 14th, 1779 from the plantation then called Notown and a part of Charlemont. It is recorded in the town history that he became very active in town affairs serving for a time as the town clerk, an assessor, a school committee member, a selectman, and an overseer of the poor. He was elected multiple times as Buckland’s representative to the General Court of the Massachusetts Legislature. Due to his business of manufacturing and selling clocks, his cutting engine is now in the American Clock & Watch Museum in Bristol, Connecticut, the neighborhood around his home and shop was called “Clock Hollow” by the locals. It is thought that he purchased his cases from a Daniel Warner. A tall case clock attributed to Sherwin and Warner remains in the Wilder Homestead collection in that town. The town of Buckland had an industrious center due to the power provided from the Clesson river. Various wooden wares were made in great quantities. William Sherwin died in 1877.

William Sherwin of Buckland, Massachusetts

This is a very good example of an unusual transitional shelf clock attributed to William Sherwin of Buckland, Massachusetts. This example… read more

Skinner & Seward of Boston, Massachusetts.

Alva Skinner watchmaker and clockmaker was born in Wakefield, New Hampshire in 1806 and died in Malden, Massachusetts on January 23, 1883. He likely served his apprenticeship to John Sawin in Boston.

Joshua Seward was born in Portsmouth, New Hampshire on May 5, 1809 and died in Woburn, Massachusetts on July 21, 1885. He was most likely an apprentice of John Sawin’s who worked in Boston.

The Skinner & Seward partnership was formed in 1832 and was located at 63 Congress Street in Boston.

Skinner & Seward Lyre or Harp wall clock.

This is a fine mahogany lyre from wall clock or Timepiece. The clock is surmounted by a turned wooden mahogany finial.… read more

Luther Smith of Keane, New Hampshire.

Luther Smith was born in Colrian, Massachusetts around 1767 and had moved to Keene, New Hampshire sometime around 1793. He married Sarah Eveleth in Bolton, Ma in 1798. His shop was located on Federal Row which is now Main Street in Keene. He also purchased a mill from Nathan Blake on what is now known as West Street. In Keene, he built the first public clock which was installed in the old meeting-house at the head of main street in 1794. Its’ cost, including a ten year warranty, was 36 pounds. The clock’s one dial faced to the south and unfortunately the clock was lost in 1828 when the meeting-house was moved. Smith also built the first brick tavern house in 1805. Other tall clocks as well as banjo clocks, New Hampshire mirror clocks and tower clocks have been found by this Maker. He died on October 21, 1839 at the age of 73. He is buried in the Washington Street Cemetery.

Luther Smith of Keene, New Hampshire. Tall case clock.

This inlaid tall case clock is a diminutive size. it stands a mere 7 feet 1.5 inches tall to the top… read more

Luther Smith of Keene, New Hampshire

This is a nice example of New Hampshire Mirror clock which was made by Luther Smith of Keene, New Hampshire. The… read more

Smith, Tuttle and Blakeslee. Oswego, Tioga County, New York.

Smith, Tuttle and Blakeslee. Oswego, Tioga County, New York. This firm was formed in 1831 by Erastus Blakeslee, Elias Smith and Eliada Tuttle. All three were Connecticut natives and settled on the banks of the Susquehanna River in Oswego. This partnership lasted less than a year. Together they made cases for movements that they obtained from both Ephriam Downs and Jeromes & Darrow.

For a more complete listing of this firm, please read An Empire In Time / Clocks & Clockmakers of Upstate New York. This book was written by G. Russell Oechsle , Helen Boyce and Collaborators.

Smith, Tuttle and Blakeslee. Owego, Tioga County, New York.

QQ-57 Smith, Tuttle and Blakeslee. Owego, Tioga County, New York. This is a very good example of a colorful short case… read more

Samuel Solliday of Doylestown, Pennsylvania.

Samuel Solliday was born the son of John Solliday (1755-1842) and Elizabeth Hinckel (1764-1841) in 1804. Samuel father’s John and his grandfather Frederick were also clock makers. It is believed that Samuel trained under his Father John and most likely worked with him for a period of time. At the age of twenty-four, Samuel is listed in the Marlborough tax records as a single man. By 1831, Samuel has earned a medical degree and a year later is wed to Deborah Schmidt. Samuel died sometime in 1845. He is buried in Frieden’s Cemetery in Sumneytown.

Samuel Solliday of Doylestown, Pennsylvania

A very attractive and colorful tall case clock made by Samuel Solliday of Doylestown, Pennsylvania. This fine example is constructed in… read more

Barton Stillman Westerly, Rhode Island

Barton Stillman son of Joseph and Eunice (Stillman) Stillman. His birth date is unknown. His brother Paul was born in 1782 and died in 1810. His Cousin William Stillman is a better known Clockmaker from the same area. The family was known as a family of inventors. Barton is listed as working in Burlington, Connecticut in 1790 through 1795. He is then listed in Westerly in 1810. This clock is very unusual in that it is signed on the snail, “Barton Stillman No. 4. 1814.”

Barton Stillman of Burlington, Connecticut and Westerly, Rhode Island.

Barton Stillman son of Joseph and Eunice (Stillman) Stillman. His birth date is unknown. His brother Paul was born in 1782 and died in 1810. His Cousin William Stillman is a better known Clockmaker from the same area. The family was known as a family of inventors. Barton is listed as working in Burlington, Connecticut in 1790 through 1795. He is then listed in Westerly in 1810.

Barton Stillman of Westerly, Rhode Island. Tall case clock dated 1814 and numbered 4.

212098 Barton Stillman No. 4. 1814 of Westerly, Rhode Island. This is a very pretty tall case clock made by Barton… read more

Nathan Storrs of Northampton, Massachusetts.

Nathan Storrs was born in Mansfield, Connecticut on August 7th, 1768 the son of Amariah and Mary Gilbert Storrs. It is currently thought that he was trained as a clockmaker by Jacob Sargeant. Nathan first advertises in Northampton, Massachusetts in 1791 and that he is open for business and is lately from New York. In 1792, he forms a partnership with Samuel Stiles as Stiles & Storrs. This partnership quickly dissolves and in 1792 and Nathan takes on Jedidiah Baldwin as Baldwin & Storrs until 1793 when Baldwin moves to Hanover, NH. In 1827, Storrs & Cook (Benjamin F. Cook) form a partnership that lasts until 1833. In 1829, they open an additional outlet in Amherst, Massachusetts. Nathan retires in 1833 due to poor health and dies in 1839.

Abel Stowell Jr., of Charlestown, Massachusetts.

Abel Stowell Jr. was born in Worcester, Massachusetts on March 14, 1789 and died in Charlestown, Massachusetts on Sept. 6, 1860. He was the son of Abel Stowell Senior who was an ingenious individual. Senior is listed in Paul Foley’s book, Willard’s Patent Time Pieces” as a clockmaker, watchmaker, screwmaker and inventor. Over his lifetime, he applied for and was granted several patents for various types of machinery. Many of these patents involved cutting the head of a screw. It is thought that he trained his sons in many of his fields of expertise.

Abel Stowell Jr. is also listed in Foley’s book. He is listed as working in the following Massachusetts towns. They include Worcester, Groton, Medford, Boston and Charlestown. Abel Stowell Jr. worked as a clockmaker, watchmaker, screwmaker and jeweler. Stowell is listed as being in partnership with his brother-in-law James Ridgeway in 1812-16. The two were working in Groton as clockmakers under the firm name, Ridgeway & Stowell. It is interesting to note that Stowell was living in Medford by 1814 and he was married there. He also operated a screw and nail making factory in this town. Sometime around 1819, it is thought that Abel dropped the use of “junior” from his name. This was shortly after his father’s death. In 1822-23, Stowell is then listed in the Boston Directories as a clockmaker. His shop is located on Cambridge street. At the same time he was also maintaining business interests in Medford and Charlestown. In 1824 Abel and his brother John J. Stowell formed a business together in Charlestown. In November of 1835, Abel advertised that he was located at No. 78, Main Street. Here he sold “Watches, Jewelry,… Eight day Timepieces,…” Shortly after, He took his son Abel Jr. III into partnership and in November of 1838, he advertised as Abel Stowell & Son. This partnership was dissolved in 1846 and Abel Jr. started to advertise as “successors to A. Stowell & Son.” It should be noted that Abel Stowell had two sons, Abel Jr. III and Alexander who also followed him in the trade.

Abel Stowell of Charlestown, Massachusetts. Wall clock.

This mahogany cased clock was made circa 1830 and is signed in script on the dial, "Abel Stowell, Charlestown, Mass." This… read more

Abel Stowell Senior of Worcester, Massachusetts.

Abel Stowel was born in Worcester, Massachusetts on June 12, 1752. He lived 66 years before he died on August 3, 1818. He was an ingenious individual. He is listed as a clockmaker, watchmaker, screw maker and inventor. Over his lifetime, he applied for and was granted several patents for various types of machinery. Many of these patents involved cutting the head of a screw. Abel Sr had three children who followed him into the clockmaking, watch making and the jewelry trades. Even his daughter Faith, married the clockmaker James Ridgeway Jr., in January of 1802. Ridgeway was an apprentice of his.

Abel Stowel Sr. of Worcester, Massachusetts

This is a very interesting case. We have owned several clocks by this Maker in the last fifty years of business.… read more

David Studley of Hingham and Hanover, Massachusetts.

David Studley was born in Hanover, Massachusetts on March 31, 1783 and died in West Hanover on October 30, 1873 at the age of 90. At his death, he was reported to be the oldest man in Hanover. David had two sons that were involved in clockmaking. Benjamin F. was born in 1823 and died by his own hand in on Oct. 15, 1874 in Plymouth, MA. David E. was born in 1812. He was a Watchmaker and a Jeweler and in 1834 moved to North Bridgewater (now Brockton.) He died in on April 24, 1873. David Sr., served his apprenticeship under John Bailey Jr., the Quaker Clockmaker from the same town. Other apprentices that may have served with Bailey include his three sons John, Calvin and Lebbeus as well as Ruben Tower. In 1806, David described himself as a Hingham Clockmaker in a civil lawsuit that he brought against Hingham Clockmaker Joseph Bailey over an unpaid debt for whom he apparently made some clocks. During the period 1806 through 1809, Studley worked as a journey man for the Hanover Clockmaker Calvin Bailey son of John Jr. By 1850, Studley retired from clockmaking and is listed as a farmer in the 1850 Federal Census. He bequeathed all his clockmaking tools to his son Benjamin. To date, both Massachusetts shelf clocks and dwarf clocks have been found.

David Studley of Hanover, Massachusetts. His last clock.

This fine mahogany case Shelf Clock was made by David Studley of Hanover, Massachusetts. This clock is the last clock that… read more

Benjamin Swan of Augusta, Maine.

Benjamin Swan, the son of Francis and Abigail (Eliot) Swan was born in Haverhill, Massachusetts on January 15, 1792. Sometime in 1808 the Swan family moved from Haverhill to Augusta, Maine. Previously, a number of Haverhill residents had made this same move. One of which was Frederic Wingate who had establish a clock business in that town as early as 1803. It is Wingate who is thought to have trained Benjamin Swan in the art of clock making. Benjamin worked both in Augusta and the town of Hallowell as a clockmaker and silversmith from 1814 through 1867. During the War of 1812, he served as a Sergeant stationed in Wiscasset. In this year he also marries Hannah Smith of Hallowell. Benjamin Swan died in Augusta on November 27, 1867.

Elnathan Taber Roxbury, Massachusetts

Elnathan Taber was born in Dartmouth, Massachusetts on February 14, 1768. He is the older brother of Stephen Taber. Both brothers traveled to Roxbury and were trained as clockmakers by the Willards. After serving his apprenticeship, Elnathan stayed in Roxbury and worked closely with his Mentor Simon. They had a prosperous working relationship and he became one of Willards most famous apprentices. We have owned and sold numerous tall case clocks made by this maker. In addition, we have also owned a good number of wall timepieces in the form of banjo clocks and coffin clocks as well as several Massachusetts shelf clock forms.

Elnathan Taber of Roxbury, Massachusetts

This is a classic New England example. It exhibits the best of the Boston school proportions. The case is very narrow… read more

Elnathan Taber of Roxbury, Massachusetts. A labeled case.

This is a labeled example. The Clockmaker's paper set up label can be found pasted to the inside of the waist… read more

Elnathan Taber of Roxbury, Massachusetts. Wall timepiece.

This is a fine Federal Massachusetts wall Timepiece or “Banjo clock.” It was made by Elnathan Taber of Roxbury Massachusetts circa… read more

Elnathan Taber of Roxbury, Massachusetts. / Stephen Badlam cabinetmaker. / John Minot numbered 89 signed dial.

Elnathan Taber was born in Dartmouth, Massachusetts on February 14, 1768. He is the older brother of Stephen Taber. Both brothers… read more

Stephen Taber of Achusnet and New Bedford, Massachusetts.

Stephen Taber was born on October 23, 1777 in New Bedford, Massachusetts and died there on September 10th, 1862. His older brother Elnathan, was nine years his senior and had moved North to Roxbury where he served his clockmaking apprenticeship under Simon Willard. Simon considered Elnathan a highly skilled mechanic and his best apprentice. Elnathan remained in Roxbury after his indenture and continue to build clocks for himself and others in the Roxbury group of Clockmakers. It is because of this success, that it is logical to assume that Stephen was also attracted to the clockmaking community in Roxbury. Stephen was trained in Boston by Aaron Willard, Simon’s younger brother. By 1798, Stephen is recorded in the town of Roxbury Tax Records as being a Resident of Roxbury. This would suggest that he moved to Roxbury to start his apprenticeship some time in 1791-92 at the age of 14. After having served his apprenticeship, he stayed in Roxbury one year and then returned to New Bedford, Massachusetts in 1799. Here he advertised in October of that year that “Stephen Taber, (Late apprentice to Mr. Aaron Willard, Clock-Maker in Boston,) Respectfully informs the public That he carries on the Clock Making Business… at his shop in Union Street…” From this time period, until his death in 1862, it appears that he lived and worked primarily in New Bedford. He is also listed as working in Achushnet for a short period of time. Over the later part of his life the extent of his clockmaking seems to have trickled off as the years passed. This is assumed because he is listed more commonly as a merchant or a trader by 1810. By 1860, his estate was valued at over $100,000. At the time of his death in 1862, his wealth almost doubles. His wife Elizabeth, was one of the founding members of Taber Academy.

Stephen Taber of New Bedford, Massachusetts.

This very nice inlaid mahogany case features excellent mahogany veneers and retains an older if not ant an original finish. The… read more

Stephen Taber of New Bedford, Massachusetts.

This is a very nice inlaid mahogany case tall clock that features excellent mahogany veneers and an older if not original… read more

The Baird Mfg., Co. of Plattsburgh, New York.

Edward Payson Baird was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on January 26, 1860 and died in October 23, 1929 at the age of 69. In 1879 he went to work for the Seth Thomas Clock Company. He worked there until 1887 when he moved North to Montreal, Canada. Here he formed the Baird Mfg. Co. and began to build and sell advertising clocks. In July of 1890, he moved to Plattsburgh, New York and set up shop at 18 Bridge Street along the Saranac River. It is at this location that this clock was made.

The New England Clock Company

The New England Clock Company of Bristol, Connecticut was in business in 1851.

Seth Thomas

Thomas was born in Wolcott, Connecticut, in 1785. He was apprenticed as a carpenter and joiner, and worked building houses and barns. He started in the clock business in 1807, working for clockmaker Eli Terry. Thomas formed a clock-making partnership in Plymouth, Connecticut with Eli Terry and Silas Hoadley as Terry, Thomas & Hoadley.

In 1810, he bought Terry’s clock business, making tall clocks with wooden movements, though chose to sell his partnership in 1812, moving in 1813 to Plymouth Hollow, Connecticut, where he set up a factory to make metal-movement clocks. In 1817, he added shelf and mantel clocks. By the mid-1840s, he changed over to brass from wooden movements. He made the clock that is used in Fireman’s Hall. He died in 1859, whereupon the company was taken over by his son, Aaron, who added many styles and improvements after his father’s death. The company went out of business in the 1980s.

Seth Thomas Office Calendar No. 11.

This attractive wall clock was made by the Seth Thomas Clock Company of Thomaston, Connecticut. It is cataloged as the "Office… read more

Seth Thomas. Plymouth, Connecticut

This is a very good example of a Pillar & Scroll shelf clock with pasted label “Made and sold by Seth… read more

Thompson & Elliot of Baltimore, Maryland.

William Thompson and William Elliot formed a partnership in Baltimore, Maryland. It was located at 55 Gay Street in 1797 and lasted one year until January 25, 1798.

Thompson seems to have been the clockmaker of the two. He may have been British trained and is listed as a watch and clockmaker in Baltimore during the period of 1795 through 1800. It is recorded that he had five apprentices learning the wacthmaking trade and one learning clockmaking. He died in 1800.

Elliot, is also listed in Baltimore in 1799 through 1801. Very little in known of him.

Thompson & Elliot of Baltimore, Maryland.

This impressive 19th century Federal mahogany tall case clock stands a full 103.5 inches or 8 feet 7.7.5 inches tall. The… read more

Thompson & Elliot of Baltimore, Maryland.of Baltimore, Maryland.

212093 Thompson & Elliot of Baltimore, Maryland. This impressive 19th century Federal mahogany tall case clock stands a full 103.5 inches… read more

Horace Tift of Attleboro, Massachusetts.

Horace Tift was born in Attleboro on December 18th, 1804. He lived 84 years and died in Providence, Rhode Island on March 11, 1886. He was trained as a machinist in Millbury, MA and was thought to been in the clock business until 1850 when he is last listed as a Jewelry manufacturer.

Theodore Ruggles Timby of Saratoga Springs, New York.

Theodore Ruggles Timby was born in New York state on April 5th, 1822. He was a very bright person. Some of the inventions he is credited with are a floating dry dock system for the shipping industry, a revolving gun turret a version of which was installed on the Union’s ironclad, the U.S.S. Monitor, and a sighting system and electrical firing system for heavy guns are to name a few. Timby dies in Brooklyn New York in 1909.

This Timby Solar Timepiece was made by L. E. Whiting of Saratoga Springs, New York. He was a local jeweler. Inside the case attached to the back of the lower door is a label that reads: “TIMBY’S SOLAR TIMEPIECE, MANUFACTURED BY L. E. WHITING, SARATOGA SPRINGS, N. Y.” It then describes the clock as, “Illustrating the Diurnal Revolution of the Earth, and serving as a GEOGRAPHICAL EDUCATOR for the SCHOOL ROOM and the Family, Ornamental in the Parlor, and useful everywhere. The old and unmeaning clockface may now be banished from use as no longer desirable. The movements in these Time – pieces is the best ever made in America, and unsurpassed in Europe; the balance wheel is set in jewels, making it as a time – keeper equal to the best lever watch and regulated in the same way. WIND ONCE A WEEK REGULARLY. WARRANTED accurate and of perfect workmanship throughout.” This label is an older xerox copy of an original label that was copy from clock number 98. This is also an example we once owned.

Lewis E. Whiting is recorder in “American Clocks. Volume 3. American Clockmakers and Watchmakers.” This book was written by Sonya l. & Thomas J. Spittler, and Chris Bailey. Whiting is listed as working within the 1860’s as working with Theodore Ruggles Timby. The company was formed in 1863 and lasted only 2 short years, (1865). The movements found in these clocks are reported as being made in Saratoga by either E. F. Rawson or more popularly believed by LaPort Hubbell. The clocks were sold by L. E. Whiting and he advertised that they were the Best made in America and unsurpassed in Europe… making it an excellent timekeeper…” These clocks were marketed to “Geographical Educators for the School room and the family.” It is said to have appealed to the prosperous transient population of Saratoga.

Ansel Turner of Roxbury, Massachusetts.

Ansel Turner was born in Roxbury, Massachusetts on October 20, 1787 and died in Savannah, Georgia on October 3, 1814. Turner is listed in 1810 -14 Roxbury voting lists as a clockmaker. He was taxed in Roxbury in May 1809 for “1 Poll + for Knower’s shop”. This suggests that he may have been in business with Daniel Knower who is also listed as a clockmaker. (Roxbury Town Records) Turner advertised from Roxbury Street in December 1811, that he was “compelled (by bodily indisposition) to relinquish his present line of business, and offers for sale, an elegant assortment of Clocks and Patent Timepieces, Clock Weights, Catgut, &c. Likewise – a complete set of Clock-makers Tools & Materials.” The Savannah death records indicate Turner was a Clockmaker from Massachusetts, and died at the young age 25. (NEHGR, Vol. 125, p. 35) An early patent timepiece having crossbanded frames and a tablet marked “S. Willard’s Patent” is known with the movement inscribed “A. Turner, No. 27, 1809”. Three signed painted dial tall case clocks are known. All three feature Roxbury style cases.

For additional information, please read Paul Foley’s, Willard’s Patent Time Pieces.

Ansel Turner of Roxbury, Massachusetts.

This is a nicely proportioned case standing approximately 7 feet 11 inches tall to the top of the center finial. The… read more

Thomas Wagstaffe of London, England.

“Thomas Wagstaffe, London.” He is listed in Brain Loomes “Watchmakers & Clockmakers of the World, Volume 1,” As working between 1756 through 1793. Thomas was born in 1724 in the small town of Banbury, Oxfordshire, England. This town is located some 67 miles northwest of London. By 1753 he is listed as a Merchant and Taylor in London later as a Watchmaker. It is said that he was a physically large individual. He was diligent and prolific worker and by temperament, patient and conscientious. His correspondence indicate a warm and highly socialized personality. He was a dedicated Quaker and had many acquaintance who lived in America. Most of whom lived in the Philadelphia area. When Quakers from Colonial American visited London, they were welcomed and received lodging in his home. It was not uncommon for many to return to America with one of his movements to be cased here. Some 30 plus examples exist, including one which is in the collection at Winterthur with a case constructed by Thomas Affleck who was a very talented Philadelphia cabinetmaker. Wagstaffe clocks are highly prized in England and enjoy the same hallowed reputation as the Willard Family does in America. Thomas lived until 1802.

Thomas Wagstaffe, London

This is a superb English Bracket Clock that retains it's original ebonized case, bell top and decorative brass mounts. The case… read more

Waltham Clock Company of Waltham, Massachusetts.

The various forms of the Waltham Clock and Waltham Watch Companies enjoyed a solid reputation for making quality clocks. It was first established in Waltham, Massachusetts in January of 1897 as the Waltham Clock Company in Waltham, Massachusetts. Their products were excellent quality, first selling primarily hall clocks, shelf clocks and then wall clocks. In 1913 they sold out to the watch making giant Waltham Watch but continued to make clocks under the Waltham Clock name until 1923 when the name was changed to the Waltham Watch and Clock Company. In 1925 the name was again changed, this time to the Waltham Watch Co. It is reported that pendulum clock production ended sometime around 1930.

The Waltham Clock Company

This photo shows three Waltham banjo clocks that share the same tablet theme. Each depicts a view of the Boston State… read more

Caleb Wheaton of Providence, Rhode Island.

Caleb Wheaton (1757 -1827) set up shop in Providence, Rhode Island. His shop was located at 83 Main Street during the period 1785 – 1827. It is here that the Quaker Clock & Watchmaker advertised for sale clocks of his own manufacture, as well as imported watches “lately received from London.” He quickly established himself as a superlative maker of movements, some of which are found in wide range of exceptional Newport and Boston styled cases. Numerous examples have been found to date that incorporate various bonnet forms. They include a pagoda top, a swan’s neck pediment, a simple dome top and the traditional New England fret work form seen on this fine example. This diverse variety in case forms is a testament to his long working career. In 1810, he formed a partnership with one of his sons, possibly Calvin or Godfrey. In October, November and December of 1825, the firm Simon Willard and Son of Boston advertised in the “Rhode Island American” and “Providence Gazette” that Caleb Wheaton was an “Agent for vending their patent Time-peices.” Wheaton was one of the best known clockmakers of his time. He is best known for having made the clock in the tower of the First Baptist Meeting House. His long career yielded a large variety of clocks that were often made in collaboration with other clockmakers from different regions. Tall clocks and watches signed by this maker have been found.

Caleb Wheaton of Providence, Rhode Island. A very tall, tall case clock

Tall case clocks were among the most highly valued and rarest of possessions, as well as costly to acquire in comparison… read more

Job White of Massachusetts.

There is very little information published regarding Job White. The best listing that I have found was researched by Paul Foley and is included in his book, “Willard’s Patent Timepieces.” Foley lists White as a journeyman who work for Simon Willard. He also references court dealings with Boston cabinetmaker Elisha Adams and Clockmaker Gardner Parker. Very few clocks have been recorded with this Maker’s signature to date.

Benjamin Whitear

Benjamin was born the son of John Whitear Sr. He was a successful bell founder, clockmaker, a warden of his church and an important and respected citizen. John Sr. had seven children, but because of the burning of Fairfield by the British under General Tryon in 1779, little information is known. In this fire, records of the Trinity Church were lost. It is thought that Benjamin worked as early as 1770 through approximately 1800. On May 15, 1764, he did marry Sarah (Beers) Buclkley. He is recorded in Norwalk in 1768 and then in Sharon in 1774. It is likely he was taught the trade of clockmaking by his Father John Sr.

Riley Whiting of Winsted, Connecticut.

Riley Whiting was born in Torrington, Conn., on January 16, 1785 the son of Christopher and Mary (Wilcox) Whiting. in 1806, he married Urania Hoadley and served his apprenticeship with the Hoadleys in Plymouth, Connecticut making wooden geared clocks. In 1807, Riley, Samuel and Luther Hoadley formed a partnership and began building short and long pendulum clocks in Winchester. Luther Hoadley died in 1813 and about the same time, Samuel entered the U. S. Army. This left Riley in business all by himself. He continued as sole proprietor and in 1819 moved to the town of Winsted until he died in 1835. It is thought that he began to manufacture shelf clock movements about 1828. During this later period, Riley is thought to have perfected the eight-day wooden geared movement. After his death, his widow and 15 year old son Riley Jr., continued a limited operation until 1841 when they sold out to William L. Gilbert.

Oliver Wight of Sturbridge, Massachusetts

Oliver Wight was born in Medway, Massachusetts on September 27, 1765 and died in Sturbridge on October 22, 1837. His Parents David Wight, born August 16th, 1733 and Catherine Morse, born March 5th 1737 were both originally from Medfield, Massachusetts and married on June 19th, 1760. Together they settled just west in Medway immediately after their marriage. Six years later, they erected a house on the great road in that town and opened it for public entertainment. Here they remained until they sold this property in 1773. In that year, they purchased 1000 acres of land in Sturbridge. Approximately 40 miles west, Sturbridge was at that time considered wild wilderness. By 1775, Mr. Wight and his three boys, David Wight 2nd, Oliver and Alpheus had cleared enough land to grow grains and grass and with this move, they become one of the first settlers of this town.

AT the age of 21, Oliver married Harmony Child in Sturbridge on July 5, 1786. They had eleven children and enjoyed a brief period of prosperity.

Oliver, like his brothers David and Alpheus, acquired property form their father who held expansive property holdings. In 1789, Oliver and Harmony were thought to have had the housewright Samuel Stetson build their Georgian style dwelling. This clap-boarded homestead featured a hipped-gable roof, two interior chimneys and a ballroom on the second story that spans the front of the building. This impressive building is now part of Old Sturbridge Village (OSV) and is one of only two buildings on the OSV property that stands on it’s original site. This property was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982. Here, Oliver also constructed a sizable shop. Oliver was an ambitious cabinetmaker. He is said to have built chairs, tables, chests, bed steads, and other household furniture. He is recorded as advertising his wares in the Massachusetts Spy, a newspaper published in Worcester. An advertisement placed on June 13, 1793 “Respectfully informs the Publick, THAT he carries on the CABINET and CHAIRMAKING BUSINESS in it’s various branches…” Another sign of their prosperity is the existence of the couple’s portraits which can be found in the collections of The Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Folk Art Museum at Colonial Williamsburg. They are thought to have been painted by Beardsley Limner. Financial troubles soon followed the family sometime around 1793. An advertisement placed on September 5th, 1793 in the Massachusetts Spy was taken out by Deputy Sheriff James Upham. This notice claims that Oliver had absconded and that on the 23rd of that month, He was going to sell “A PRETTY affortment (assortment) of Cabinet Work, Houfehold Furniture, Hard Ware, and many other Articles, too numerous to Mention…” in order to eliminate three hundred and fifty (British) pounds of debt. Later, the family was forced to sell the house in 1795. Oliver moves to Providence, Rhode Island and in April of 1802, The Massachusetts Spy reports that Oliver is to face the court and is bankrupt.

Oliver Wight of Sturbridge, Massachusetts

This newly discovered tall case clock is signed by the Sturbridge Massachusetts cabinetmaker Oliver Wight. This example is signed inside the… read more

Joshua Wilder of Hingham, Massachusetts

Joshua Wilder was born on December 2nd, 1786 in Hingham, Massachusetts. He was trained in the art of clockmaking by John Bailey Jr. of Hanover, MA. Wilder completed this apprenticeship some time around 1807. It appears he stayed in Hanover for a brief period of time before moving back to Hingham to established his home and business loctaed on Main Street in the South Parish. Here, he was the first clockmaker to settle in this prosperous town and found a ready market for tall case clocks, dwarf clocks, wall timepieces, the Massachusetts shelf form and mirror clocks. Wider becomes one of America’s most prolific Makers of the dwarf clock form.

Wilder also becomes very active in the local religious Society of Friends and became known as the “Old Quaker Joshua Wilder.” He was also involved with the Temperance Society and Peace Society of Hingham. Wilder’s business eventually evolves into a retailer of common goods. Wilder is said to have trained several Clockmakers that includes his son Ezra Wilder, Rebeun Tower, Allen Kelley and Phillip Bennet. About 1840, it is said that his son Eza joined him in business. Joshua dies October 4, 1860 in the town of Scituate.

Joshua Wilder Dwarf Clock

This is a formal example of a dwarf tall clock made by Joshua Wilder of Hingham, MA. read more

Joshua Wilder of Hingham, Massachusetts

RR-72 Joshua Wilder of Hingham, Massachusetts. Dwarf Clock. Wilder dwarf clocks fall into two main categories. It appears that he offered… read more

Charles Wilder of Peterborough, New Hampshire. An American barometer maker.

Charles Wilder was born the son of Mark and Eliza Ann ( Thayer ) Wilder. He attended the common schools and the Academy in Peterborough. He became a popular teacher at the Academy and later the Principal. He had planned to continue his education and become a layer but his Fathers debts forced him into the family business of shoe pegs. He pursued this business for two years when in 1860 he secured the rights to manufacture portable mercury barometers under the patent issued to a Mr. Woodruff of Ann Arbor, Michigan. Each barometer had a natural position and use for a thermometer so he developed his own line. Wilder Barometers were sold throughout the United States by advertising through the leading agricultural periodicals of the day.

As a successful businessman and prominent citizen he was an active member and supporter of his Church. He served as a representative to the State Legislature in 1869 and 1870 and was also a Town Moderator in 1869. In 1900 he died. The business continued for a short time until it was sold to the W. & L. E. Gurley Instrument Company of Troy, New York. (Most of this info was provided from the Peterborough, New Hampshire Historical Society.)

Chales Wilder Barometers. Peterborough, New Hampshire.

Pictured here are the three versions of wall barometers made by Charles Wilder. The one to the left is considered the… read more

Charles Wilder of Peterborough, New Hampshire.

This stick barometer is American made. It was made by Charles Wilder of Peterborough, New Hampshire. This instrument has a straight… read more

Aaron Willard of Grafton, Roxbury and Boston, Massachusetts.

Aaron Willard was born in Grafton, Massachusetts on October 13th, 1757. Little is known of his early life in Grafton. It is here that he probably learned the skill of clock making from his older brothers Benjamin and Simon. It is recorded that he did march with them in response to the Lexington Alarm on April 19,1775. In 1780, Aaron moved from Grafton to Roxbury along with his brother Simon. Here the two Willard brothers establish a reputation for themselves as fine clock manufactures. They were both responsible for training a large number of apprentices, many of which became famous clock makers in their own right. The Willards dominated the clock making industry in the Boston area during the first half of the nineteenth century. Aaron worked in a separate location in Roxbury from his brother and relocated about a quarter mile away from Simon’s shop across the Boston line about 1792. Aaron is listed in the 1798 Boston directory as a clock maker ‘on the Neck’ and his large shop employed up to 30 people, while 21 other clock makers, cabinetmakers, dial and ornamental painters and gilders worked within a quarter-mile radius by 1807. We have owned a large number of tall case clocks made by this important Maker. In addition, we have also owned a good number of wall timepieces in the form of banjo clocks as well as numerous Massachusetts shelf clock forms.

Aaron Willard of Boston, Massachusetts. A long case clock.

This is an important inlaid mahogany case tall clock made by Aaron Willard of Boston, Massachusetts. This is a classic Roxbury… read more

Aaron Willard of Roxbury, Massachusetts. A labeled case.

This important inlaid mahogany case tall clock was made by Aaron Willard of Roxbury, Massachusetts.   This is a classic Roxbury… read more

Aaron Willard of Roxbury, Massachusetts. Tall case clock.

This important labeled mahogany case tall clock was made by Aaron Willard of Roxbury, Massachusetts.   This is a classic Roxbury… read more

Simon Willard of Grafton and Roxbury, Massachusetts.

Simon Willard was born in Grafton, Massachusetts on April 3, 1753. It is in Grafton that Simon learned and began a successful career as a Clockmaker. On April 19, 1775 Simon answered the Lexington alarm along with his brothers. It is thought that by 1780 he moved from Grafton and took up residence in Roxbury. Simon was a Master Clockmaker as well as an Inventor. Some of his designs or inventions include “The Improved Timepiece” or Banjo clock, a roasting jack patent that rotated meat as it cooked in the fireplace, and an alarm clock patent. In addition, he trained many men to make clocks who intern became well known Clockmakers once their apprenticeships were served. Some of which include William Cummens, Elnathan Taber, and the brothers Levi and Able Hutchins. Some of the more notable public clocks Simon built include the clock that is in The United States Capital, the one located in the U. S. Senate, and the one located in the House of Representatives. As a result, his clock were searched out by many affluent New England citizens of his day. Simon died on August 30, 1848 at the age of 95.

Simon Willard of Roxbury, Massachusetts. Warranted for Mr. Daniel Phillips.

This inlaid mahogany tall case clock was made by Simon Willard of Roxbury, Massachusetts. This mahogany case is nicely proportioned. It… read more

Simon Willard of Roxbury, Massachusetts. A bedroom clock

This tall case clock was made by Simon Willard of Roxbury, Massachusetts. This mahogany case is nicely proportioned. The case is… read more

Alexander Willard of Ashby, Massachusetts.

It is reported that Alexander Tarbell Willard was a direct descendant of Col. Simon Willard (1605-1676), a co-founder of Concord, Massachusetts in 1637. Col. Willard had three wives who bore him seventeen children. The descendants of which made the Ashby / Ashburnham Willard families relatives of the Grafton / Boston Willard clockmaking families. I wonder if they knew of each other?

Alexander T. Willard was the son of an Ashburnham, Massachusetts farmer, Jacob Willard (1734-1808) and his wife Rhoda Randall of Stow, Massachusetts. He was born in this town on November 4th, 1774. He had one brother named Philander Jacob Willard who was also a clockmaker. It is now thought that he served his clockmaking apprenticeship with the Edwards Brothers of Ashby. He apparently worked in Ashburnham for only a brief time (1796-1800). On May 24th, 1800, Alexander married Tila Oakes of Cohasset. She was employed as a school teacher working in Ashby. They married and moved to Ashby shortly after. It has been recorded that she painted some of the wooden tall clock dials for his clocks.

In Ashby, Alexander made a large number of wooden geared tall clocks and became a prominent citizen of that town. He was employed as a Postmaster (1812-1836), as Town Clerk (1817 – 1821) and he invested and managed the construction of the Ashby Turnpike. It ran through Ashby center from Townsend to New Hampshire. We know that he made many wooden movement tall clocks because we have personally seen and own a fair number of them. It is also reported from various sources that he made the follow items; a musical clock, tower clocks, timepieces, old fashion theodolites or compasses, gunters chains, scales, timers, seraphones (A forerunner of the reed organ), rifles and repaired watches. I have no personal knowledge of any of these other items.

Alexander Willard of Ashby, Massachusetts

This example is quite typical of the standard form that one would expect to see from an Ashby Clockmaker. The case… read more

Ephriam Willard

Ephraim Willard was born in Grafton, Massachusetts on March 18th, 1755. He parents, Benjamin Willard and Sarah Brooks had twelve children. Four of the boys became clockmakers. Little is known of Ephriam’s early life in Grafton where he probably learned clock making from his older brothers Benjamin and Simon. Simon Willard (1753-1848) was to become America’s most famous clockmaker. It is recorded that Ephraim did march with his brothers in response to the Lexington Alarm on April 19,1775. His service lasted all of one week and five days. In 1777 he took up residence in Medford, Massachusetts and was listed as a clock and watchmaker. In 1784, a lawsuit identifies him a a trader living in Boston. In 1795 through 1801, he is listed as a Roxbury resident in the Roxbury Tax Records. In 1801, he purchased land and a house on Sheaf’s Lane in Boston. The deed for this transaction describes Ephraim as a “Merchant.” Financial difficulties soon followed over the next two years and Ephraim was then described as a Clockmaker. In 1804, he is listed in the Boston Tax Records as a clockmaker on Elliot Street. In 1805 Ephraim moved to New York City and is listed occasionally as a watchmaker until 1832. Ephraim, like his older brother Benjamin, was a bit of a wanderer. It seems his production as a Clockmaker was a fraction of what his three other brothers produced. A small number of tall clocks are know.

Ephraim Willard of Boston Massachusetts

This inlaid mahogany case tall clock was made by Ephraim Willard of Boston, Massachusetts. This fine inlaid mahogany case features very… read more

Benjamin Willard of Grafton, Lexington, and Roxbury, Massachusetts.

Benjamin Willard is the oldest of four Willard clockmaking brothers. His younger brother Simon is considered by many to be America’s most famous Clockmaker. The two other younger brothers that also made clocks include Ephraim and Aaron. Benjamin was born March 19, 1743. As a New England Clockmaker, he never stayed in one location for an extended period of time. In December 1764, he advertised himself as a maker of shoe lasts and that he was located in East Hartford, Connecticut at the home of Benjamin Cheney. Because Cheney was and established clockmaker, it is logical to assume that he received some wooden geared clock training from him. In fact, two signed Benjamin wooden geared clocks are known and interestingly, both feature the Cheney construction form. Returning from Hartford to Grafton sometime in 1766 and by early 1767, Benjamin relocated to Lexington, Massachusetts. Here it is recorded that he worked with and then succeeded the brass clockmaker Nathaniel Mulliken. It is thought that Benjamin received some level of brass construction clockmaking training from Mulliken before he past in late 1767. Shortly there after, he hired a John Morris to teach himself and his brothers Simon and Aaron brass clockmaking. During this period, he advertised that he maintained separate shops in both towns until 1771 when it appears he moved the Lexington shop to Roxbury. The Roxbury shop then moved to Brookline in 1775. During the period 1777-78 he advertised being located in Medford. Benjamin moved back to Grafton and then later Worcester and then to Baltimore, Maryland where he died in September of 1803.

On September 3rd of 1789, Benjamin advertised in the Herald and Worcester Recorder that he had moved from Grafton to Worcester and that he had manufactured 359 clocks in the past 23 years. That works out to approximately 15 or 16 clocks per year during that period. He also states that he had left Roxbury in 1775. Current research suggests that somewhere shortly after clock number 239 he moved from Roxbury and these are perhaps pre-revolutionary.

Benjamin Willard of Roxbury, Massachusetts. No. 207.

This is a fine Chippendale mahogany case tall clock featuring an engraved brass dial that is finished with a silver wash.… read more

Aaron Willard Junior of Boston, Massachusetts.

Aaron Willard Jr. was born in Roxbury, Massachusetts on June 29, 1803. He had the good fortune of being born into AmericaÕs leading clockmaking family. His father Aaron and uncle Simon had recently moved from the rural community of Grafton and began a productive career of manufacturing high quality clocks in this new ideal location. Based on the traditions of the day, it is thought that Aaron Jr. probably learned the skill of clockmaking from his family. We have owned a large number of wall timepieces or more commonly called banjo clocks that were made by this talented maker. Based on the numbers seen in the marketplace, it is logical to assume he was one of the most prolific makers of this form. We have also owned a fair number of tall case clocks, Massachusetts shelf clocks and gallery clocks. Aaron Jr. retired from clockmaking sometime around 1850 and moved to Newton, Massachusetts. He died on May 2nd, 1864.

Aaron Willard Jr. tall case clock of Boston, Massachusetts.

This fine inlaid mahogany case tall clock was made by Aaron Willard Jr. of Boston, Massachusetts. This inlaid mahogany case is… read more

Aaron Willard Jr., of Boston, Massachusetts. An impressive gallery clock.

This important gilded case Gallery Clock was made by Aaron Willard Jr., of Boston, Massachusetts in 1831.   The true weight… read more

Simon Willard Junior of Boston, Massachusetts.

Simon Jr., was born January 13,1795 in Roxbury, Massachusetts. He served his clock apprenticeship to his father Simon and in 1810-1812 to his brother in law John Pond who was a Watchmaker working in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. In 1826-27 he lived in New York City in order to trained as a chronometer maker under Dominick Eggert. in 1813, he entered West Point Military Academy and graduated two years later in March. He was commissioned in the Ordnance Corps and sent to the Pittsburgh Arsenal on the Allegheny River in Pennsylvania. In May of 1816, he resigned at the rank of Lieutenant and returned to Roxbury in 1817 and went into the glassware and Crockery business. On December 6th, 1821 he Married Eliza Adams. Together they had seven children. As early as 1823, Simon Jr. was in business with his father as Simon Willard & Son. When he returned from his apprenticeship in chronometer making In 1826, he set up his own shop on No. 9 Congress Street in Boston. Here he became very successful as a merchant and a chronometer repairman. He was famous among sea captains and sailors as a weather prophet. Simon Jr., was a talented person and financially successful.

Simon Willard & Son of Boston, Massachusetts. No. 4611. Wall timepiece or Banjo clock.

This is a fine Federal Massachusetts wall Timepiece or “Banjo clock.” It was made by the partnership Simon Willard & Son… read more

David Williams of Newport, Rhode Island.

David Williams clockmaker, watchmaker, silversmith and jeweler was born in Rochester, MA in 1769. He is listed in Paul Foley’s book, “Willard’s Patent Timepieces” as working in both Newport and Providence, Rhode Island and began his clock making career sometime around 1790. He was one of, if not the most prolific clockmakers in Rhode Island. We have owned many tall clocks, Massachusetts Shelf clocks and banjo clocks in the recent past. It is interesting to note that we know who made the banjo clock cases for Williams. A probate court record exists that indicates that John Young performed this service. David Williams died in Newport on June 29, 1823 at the ae of 54.

David Williams of Newport, Rhode Island. Tall case clock.

This a fine cross banded mahogany case tall clock was made by David Williams of Newport, Rhode Island. This case is… read more

Moses Wing of Windsor, Connecticut.

Moses Wing was born April 25,1760. He served in the Revolutionary War and was present at the retreat from New York. He was know as a Goldsmith, but made brass clocks, silver spoons, etc. By the style of the dial and the construction of the movement and case, one can assume that he trained with Daniel Burnap who was a Thomas Harland apprentice. Wing died in 1809 and is buried in Windsor where his tombstone still stands.

Jonathan Winslow

Jonathan Winslow was born in south eastern Massachusetts in the town of Rochester on August 15, 1765. He was the son of Shubael and Azubah (Blogett) Winslow. He is recorded as having moved and worked in several Massachusetts towns including New Salem, Worcester, Brookfield in 1795, Palmer and Springfield. He married Elizabeth Bailey of Worcester on January 1, 1790. Jonathan died in Springfield on July 20, 1847.

It was perviously thought that he served his clockmaking apprenticeship with the Cheneys in East Hartford, Connecticut. This family is now well known for being primarily wooden movement clockmakers. This information is disputed in Philip Morris’s new book, “American Wooden Movement Tall Clocks 1712 – 1835” due to the lack of similarity in construction styles. We have seen and owned several Winslow dwarf clocks over the last forty-five years. A percentage of these clocks are die-stamp on the seatboard by the Maker. This case form appears to be the most common form of this Maker’s output. There might be less that a dozen of these dwarf cases pictured in the horological literature.

Jonathan Winslow of Worcester, Massachusetts

This very simple country example is referred to as a “Dwarf clock.” It stands a mere 47 inches tall. The case… read more

David Wood of Newburyport, Massachusetts.

David Wood was born the son of John and Eunice Wood in Newburyport, Massachusetts on July 5, 1766. It is thought that he may have been apprenticed to either Daniel Balch Senior or one of the members of the Mulliken family. All of whom were prominent Clockmakers in this region. On June 13, 1792, David advertised that he had set up a shop in Market Square, near Reverend Andrews Meeting House, where he made and sold clocks. Three short years latter, he married Elizabeth Bird in 1795. It has become evident, that David Wood was also a Retailer. In 1806, he advertised that he had for sale “Willard’s best Patent Timepieces, for as low as can be purchased in Roxbury.” In the year 1818, he and Abel Moulton, a local silversmith, moved into the shop formerly occupied by Thomas H. Balch. In 1824 he advertised that he had moved on the westerly side of Market Square opposite the Market House. After his wife’s death in 1846, he moved to Lexington to live near is son David, who was a merchant in that town.

It has become quite obvious to us that David Wood was a very successful Clockmaker and Retailer of Clocks. Over the last 40 plus years of being in the business of selling clocks, we have sold many examples of wall, shelf, and tall case clocks bearing this Maker’s signature on the dial.

David Wood of Newburyport, Massachusetts.

The Massachusetts shelf clock can be loosely categorized into four forms that are most often described by the shape of the… read more

David Wood of Newburyport, Massachusetts.

This is a fine birch tall case clock with a lovely painted dial signed by David Wood of Newburyport, Massachusetts. This… read more

Mr. David Wood

A period photograph of David Wood who is seated. read more

David Young

It is reported that David Young was most likely born on July 13, 1746 in Kingston, New Hampshire. In 1773 he married Sarah Eastman of Concord. Together they had two children. He may have been in Hopkington, New Hampshire as soon as 1776. By 1800, he is taxed for stock and trade in that town. In 1801 he is listed as a “cabinetmaker.” and is also described as a joiner in numerous transactions. The Hopkinton Baptist Church records his death on December 10, 1836. We definitively know that Young made cases for Levi and Able Hutchins of Concord, Timothy Chandler of Concord and Edmund Currier of Hopkinton. It is interesting to note that the Town of Hopkington, in the early 1800’s, was visited daily by a stage. It was located in a direct line of travel between Boston and Montreal. The town steadily grew until the 1830’s.

David Young labeled case. Hopkinton, New Hampshire

This is a very good example of a popular case form made in the Concord region of New Hampshire. This fine… read more