Attributed to Jonah Edson of Bridgewater, Massachusetts. A Clockmaker and Brass Founder. An inlaid cherry case tall clock.

This is a finely proportioned example. The case is constructed in cherry and is decorated with two complex line inlay patterns. These can be found on the base panel and also on the waist door. The case stands on four applied French feet. These are designed with a subtle flare and a small return. They are applied to the base molding and provide excellent height. The waist is long and narrow. It features a rectangular waist door that is trimmed with a molded edge. Fluted quarter columns which terminate in brass quarter capitals are fitted into the front corners of the waist. The molded hood or bonnet is mounted with three rectangular and inlay decorated chimneys. Each supports a brass urn style finial. The pierced fretwork pattern is a wonderful regional design and has been seen on other clock cases made in this region. The molded arched cornice is hand planed. It is visually supported by fluted colonnettes that terminate in brass capitals and bases. These flank the arched tombstone-form dial door. This door opens to a finely painted iron dial of Boston origin.

This wonderfully painted dial was painted in Boston and is attributable to the Spencer Nolen dial firm. The arch is decorated with a lovely scene that features a stone bridge. The bridge spans a river with five arches. The activity on the river suggests a region of commerce. The clock face, which has Roman style numerals to demark each hour and an outer ring of Arabic numerals to demark the five minute positions, is framed with classical gilt scroll-form spandrels.

The time and strike movement is quite distinctive in the manner which it has been Skeletonized. The plates are brass and been heavily relieved in an attempt to conserve brass. This pattern is somewhat distinctive and varies considerably from the Bailey versions being manufactured in Hanover. This movement also incorporates another feature that is more commonly found on signed clocks by Edson. This clock uses a count wheel striking system as compared to the now more commonly used rack and snail set up. We have owned at least one clock with a movement of nearly identical movement design that featured a painted Boston made dial that was signed by Jonah Edson, Bridgewater. It is logical to assume that this unsigned example was made by the same Maker. The weight driven movement is of good quality and is designed to run for an eight-day duration.

This clock was made circa 1815. This clock case is stands 7 feet 6.5 inches tall to the top of the center finial. It is approximately 21 inches wide and 9.75 inches deep.

About Jonah Edson of Bridgewater and Dighton, Massachusetts and Bristol, Rhode Island.

Jonah Edson was born in West Bridgewater, Massachusetts on March 18, 1792 and died in East Bridgewater, Massachusetts on December 7, 1874. He is thought to have been trained as a clockmaker by John Bailey II in Hanover, MA. Edson is recorded as working in both in Bridgewater and Dighton, Massachusetts and also Bristol, Rhode Island. He was at work about 1813. He served with the Bridgewater Light Infantry during the War of 1812 and was stationed in South Boston in 1814. It is now believed that he made approximately twenty five clocks.

It appears that many of his tall clock movements are constructed in a distinctive style. The plates that frame the movement are usually Skeletonized. This is the process of removing the xtra brass in an attempt to conserve brass. His pattern is somewhat distinctive and varies considerably from the Bailey versions being manufactured in Hanover. His movement often incorporate two other additional features that are somewhat unusual. This includes the uses of a count wheel striking system as compared to the now more commonly used rack and snail set up and also wooden winding drums.

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