Chelsea Clock Company No. 1 Pendulum. Weight driven wall clock.

The Chelsea Clock Company Board of Directors met for the first time on July 28, 1897. The Board consisted of Whipple N. Potter, Jr., President, Charles H. Pearson, Treasurer, Reginald Foster, Clerk and Secretary. Allen L. Shepherd served on the Board with the elected officers. This first group of individuals was not together long. The Chelsea firm persevered and has enjoyed a long run of success as a result of making clocks of superior manufacture. This company made many clocks. Some of which were in the style of the Willard timepiece or banjo clock, the E. Howard Model No., 70 and more famously, marine clocks. This company remains in business today.

This clock, having a large dial and long drop, is a very popular form. Many competitors offered a similar clock. Chelsea's version is called the "Pendulum No. 1." It was offered in hardwood cases of golden oak and light or dark colored quartered oak, cherry and mahogany. The mahogany was a 10% up charge. In 1911, this model sold foe $18.00.

This clock is cased in oak and has a very dry original finish. The twelve inch white enameled non-crackable dial is painted on tin. This dial is in excellent original condition and is signed boldly across the front. The movement is brass and die-stamped on the front plate in the upper right with the Maker's name, "Chelsea Clock Company". It is also numbered "33766" in the upper left. This number indicates that this clock was made in 1908.

The movement is weight driven and is designed to run for eight-days on a full wind. The brass plates are extra heavy insuring rigidity to the movement. The steel pinions are cut and polished, the pivots are hardened and polished. The escapement is a recoil format. The pendulum rod is wood and the bob is brass. The motion of this pendulum can be viewed through the lower door. This clock also retains the clockmaker's original set up label. This can be seen pasted to the back of the door.

These clocks were used extensively in the public school systems of cities like Boston, New York and Brooklyn. They were also used in the offices of various railroad companies, fire departments, etc. This early example measures 34 inches long, 16 inches wide and 5 inches deep. It was made in 1908.

About Chelsea Clock Company of Boston, Massachusetts.

The Chelsea Clock Company Board of Directors met for the first time on July 28, 1897. The Board consisted of Whipple N. Potter, Jr., President, Charles H. Pearson, Treasurer, Reginald Foster, Clerk and Secretary. Allen L. Shepherd served on the Board with the elected officers. This first group of individuals was not together long. The Chelsea firm persevered and has enjoyed a long run of success as a result of making clocks of superior manufacture. This company made many clocks. Some of which were in the style of the Willard timepiece or banjo clock, the E. Howard Model No., 70 and more famously, marine clocks. This company remains in business today.

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