English fusee powered wall clock.

This form is referred to by many names. They are called school, railway, gallery, post, pub and dial clocks to name a few. This is largely due to the popularity in the UK. In recent years, they have become increasing desirable for use in the home or office.

They are all good time keepers and are very reliable. The movements are excellent quality. They are constructed in brass and the plates and gearing are robust. The mechanisms incorporate a fusee design. The fusee features a conical shaped drum that in theory evenly regulates the power output on the spring. The vast majority of these clocks are designed to run eight days on a full wind.

Many of these are found with signed dials. Most commonly with a name and the location of where it originally hung or was displayed. It is thought that these names also represent or are related to not only the manufacturer and retailer but also could be the names of the original owners, a subsequent clock repairman or even a dial painter.

This is a very attractive wall clock was made in England circa 1880. The case is constructed in mahogany and retains an excellent rich color. The shaped is somewhat unusual in comparison to the traditional form. This example is also decorated with carved floral themed moldings that are applied to the front facade. The dial is painted and features Roman hour numerals. The name “W. VESPER / COMMERC LND RD / LONDON” is painted on the dial. This dial measures approximately11 inches in diameter.

This fine clock has the approximate dimensions: 20 inches long, 18 inches wide and 6 inches deep.

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