Belding (BD) Bingham of Nashua, New Hampshire.

Belding Dart (BD) Bingham worked primarily as a Watchmaker in Nashua, New Hampshire for most of his life. He is also reported to have worked briefly in the cities of Lowell, Waltham and in Roxbury, Massachusetts. It appears he had a working association with Leonard W. Noise, and for a short time with Fisher Thayer and J.S. Warner. The quality of his clock work is outstanding.

Bingham was born in Shoreham, Addison, Vermont on July 5th 1812. His parents were Ira Bingham and Jane (Dart) Bingham. Sometime in the early 1830’s, BD appears in Nashua, NH and is working with Leonard W. Noyes as a clockmaker. A timepiece is known that has a dial signed, “Warranted by L. W. Noyes” and the movement is inscribed “B. D. Bingham, maker 1834.” BD married Mary Brown on November 15, 1836. In 1838, BD advertises in the Nashua Gazette that he has taken the store of L. W. Noyes in the Long Block, Main Street. Here he is selling clocks, watches, jewelry, etc. He is also servicing or repairing all sorts of items. In 1850, it appears he took a residence on Pearl Street. In 1852, he moves with his family to San Francisco, California. He stays there approximately a year before he returns to Nashua. In 1859-1862, the Nashua Watch Company is being formed. BD is one of the founding members. In 1865-1866, BD serves as the superintendent of the Tremont Watch Company. This is during the absence of A. L. Dennison. During this time, BD is reported to have been living on Eustis Street in Roxbury. In 1868, he moves back to Nashua and remains there until he dies on October 4, 1878.

A small number of Bingham clocks are documented. These include: floor model astronomical regulators, large wall (Banjo Style) regulators and gallery clocks. The large regulators appear more commonly. An example seems to be offered for sale publically once every 5 or more years. For the period of 1834 to approximately 1842, the Nashua directories, documented examples, and numerous advertisements indicate or state that B.D. Bingham is a clockmaker. After 1842, the directories and advertisements do not include the word clockmaker, but continue to use the word watchmaker. It would appear that he had ceased making clocks after 1842.