James E. Conlon of Brookline, MA.

James Edward Conlon (1880–1948) was an antiques dealer and clock maker/restorer who work in Boston from the 1910s through the 1940s. He was very talented with his hands and also enjoyed researching the Clockmakers that worked a century before him. He was highly respected in the community of collectors and was eager to share his research with others. He gave lectures on the history of New England clock making at a number of local historical societies. He also lectured at a meeting of the Boston Clock Club an organization that was formed to share information about clockmakers by their enthusiasts. The Boston Clock Club restricted their membership and excluded dealers. They made an exception for James Conlon. This organization describes James Conlon as someone who “has long been engaged as a clock maker and probably has had a broader experience with fine clocks than any other person in this section. In addition to his practical experience, he has in years past devoted a great deal of time and energy to consideration of the origin and history of New England clock makers.” It is thought today that he produced a number of museum quality copies of several early American clocks. Interestingly enough, Conlon did not sign his clocks with his name. We have seen out of period Willard wall primitives, timepieces, lyre clocks, lighthouse clocks and Curtis style girandole clocks that have been attributed to Conlon by the collectors of his day. This folklore has been passed down through the years. James E. Conlon died on December 31 1948 at his home in Brookline, MA. He left behind his six sons and five daughters. His Son James G. Conlon took over the business in 1948.